The Journal Gazette
 
 
Monday, December 02, 2019 5:20 pm

Washington's Chris Petersen resigns, Jimmy Lake to take over

TIM BOOTH | Associated Press

SEATTLE -- Washington coach Chris Petersen has unexpectedly stepped down after six seasons at the school, with defensive coordinator Jimmy Lake promoted to run the program.

Petersen’s decision was shocking coming off a season where the Huskies went 7-5 in the regular season and are bound for a sixth straight bowl game under his leadership.

Petersen will coach the Huskies in the bowl game, his final game in charge of the program he helped grow back into national prominence during his tenure.

The school said Petersen, 55, will transition into a “leadership advisory role” within the athletic department.

Petersen has been one of college football’s most successful coaches during the last two decades, going 146-38 combined during his time at Boise State and Washington.

During six seasons at Washington, Petersen has a 54-26 record, won two Pac-12 titles and took the Huskies to three New Year’s Six bowl games, including an appearance in the national semifinals in 2016 and last year the school’s first Rose Bowl trip since the 2000 season.

Petersen was also unbeaten against rival Washington State.

In a statement, Petersen said he’ll be a “Husky for life, but now is the right time for me to step away from my head coaching duties and recharge.

“It has been a privilege and a professional dream fulfilled to be part of this world-class institution,” Petersen said. “I will forever be grateful, honored and humbled to have had the opportunity to coach our fine young men on Montlake for these past six seasons. I thank each of them, as well as our coaches and administrative staff for the incredible commitment they’ve made to Husky football during my tenure.”

Petersen spent was finally persuaded to leave Boise State in 2013 after growing the Broncos into a national powerhouse during eight seasons. He was Washington’s chosen successor to Steve Sarkisian, drawn to the school by the history of the program and the opportunity to test himself on a bigger stage -- while not leaving the comfort of a region he had spent most of his professional career.

Within three seasons, Petersen had Washington playing Alabama in the Peach Bowl for the right to play for the national title. While the Huskies fell short that day, it was a major accomplishment for a program that less than a decade earlier had gone through an 0-12 season.

Washington was expected to be a contender in the Pac-12 again this year, but struggles to replace the loss of several key players on defense and an inconsistent offense led to a subpar campaign. The Huskies’ 31-13 win over Washington State last Friday turned out to be Petersen’s last home game.

“Chris has been transformational for not only our football program, but our entire athletic department,” athletic director Jen Cohen said. “It has been such a privilege to watch how he has been so committed to the development of our young men, not just on the field, but more importantly off.

"I can’t thank him enough for his service and leadership, and I look forward to having him stay on staff in a leadership advisory role, so he can continue to impact individuals across our department and the entire campus.”

Lake, 42, has turned down several other coaching opportunities in recent years and has seemed to be the successor to Petersen whenever he did decide to step away from coaching.

Lake’s contract covers five seasons and starts at $3 million, escalating to $3.4 million for the 2024 season, according to a memorandum of understanding from the school.

“I’ve been dreaming of this opportunity for as long as I can remember, and I can’t think of a better place to do it than in the world-class city of Seattle and at such a prestigious university with a rich football tradition,” Lake said.

“This wouldn’t be possible without the mentorship of Coach Petersen, and I would like to thank him for everything he has done for me, as well as Jen Cohen for entrusting me with this opportunity.”

 


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