The Journal Gazette
 
 
Thursday, May 21, 2020 1:00 am

Trump makes threats to states over mail voting

Associated Press

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump on Wednesday threatened to hold up federal funds for two election battleground states that are trying to make it easier and safer to vote during the coronavirus pandemic.

The president's tweets targeting Michigan and Nevada marked an escalation in his campaign against voting by mail, a practice that he has publicly worried will lead so many people to vote that Republicans will lose in November. Even though the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends mail voting as a safe option during the pandemic, Trump has opposed the spread of the practice.

Wednesday marked the first time he has tried to use federal dollars to beat it back.

Trump began by targeting Michigan, with a false description of Democratic Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson's announcement Tuesday that she would send applications for absentee ballots to every voter in the state.

“Michigan sends absentee ballots to 7.7 million people ahead of Primaries and the General Election,” Trump tweeted Wednesday morning. That brought strong criticism from Michigan and elsewhere, pointing out that the state was sending applications, not ballots.

About six hours after his original tweet, Trump corrected it to say “absentee ballot applications.”

He kept the rest intact: “This was done illegally and without authorization by a rogue Secretary of State. I will ask to hold up funding to Michigan if they want to go down this Voter Fraud path!”

Trump later made a similar threat against Nevada, which has sent ballots to voters for its June 9 state primary. A federal judge recently cleared Nevada's decision to mail ballots, which were sent by the Republican secretary of state.

“State of Nevada 'thinks' that they can send out illegal vote by mail ballots, creating a great Voter Fraud scenario for the State and the U.S. They can't! If they do, 'I think' I can hold up funds to the State. Sorry, but you must not cheat in elections,” Trump tweeted.

Notably, the president did not threaten Republican-run states that are doing the same thing as Michigan. West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice, a Republican ally of the president, said he's not concerned about Trump's threats even though his administration approved mailing absentee ballot applications to all registered voters in the state.

“I can't imagine that the president is going to withhold funding in any way to West Virginia; that's not gonna happen,” Justice told reporters.

Trump's threats drew a sharp response from Democrats, who alluded to impeaching the president for threats to withhold aid from Ukraine if that country did not help his reelection effort.

“Trump has gone Ukraine on Michigan and Nevada, threatening to cut off funding for their audacity to not make voters choose between protecting their health and exercising their right to vote,” California Secretary of State Alex Padilla, a Democrat, said in a statement. “We will not allow our democracy to become a casualty of this pandemic.”

Trump has claimed absentee voting is ripe for fraud, although there is scant evidence of widespread wrongdoing. Trump himself requested a mail ballot for Florida's March GOP primary, and he has voted absentee in previous elections.

While Republicans insist that Trump's position on the issue is nuanced and not simply an effort to suppress Democratic votes, the president undermined those arguments Wednesday morning.

Michigan's Benson noted Trump's choice of states to assail, tweeting back after his original salvo: “We sent applications, not ballots. Just like my GOP colleagues in Iowa, Georgia, Nebraska and West Virginia.”

The GOP-controlled Senate has so far stopped Democrats from mandating expanded mail and early voting as part of coronavirus relief bills, arguing that states should be able to make decisions on their own election systems. The battle has largely moved to the courts, with Democrats filing at least 17 lawsuits to force states to expand their programs.

The GOP has fought back. In Texas, Attorney General Ken Paxton, a Republican, has vowed to appeal a federal judge's ruling Tuesday that the state must allow voters to request absentee ballots because of the pandemic.

Also

Biden to grads: Protect democracy

WASHINGTON – Joe Biden warned Wednesday that those “tasked with enforcing the law are abusing their powers,” offering a measured critique of the Trump administration a day after he declined to respond to President Donald Trump's attacks directly.

Speaking to Columbia University Law School graduates via video, Biden urged them to “protect the very foundations of democracy.” His comments come amid escalating rhetoric from Trump and his allies pushing conspiracy theories and alleging improper behavior during the Obama administration.

Meanwhile, the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee on Wednesday voted 8-6 to subpoena Blue Star Strategies, a lobbying firm that was a consultant to Burisma, a gas company in Ukraine that paid Biden's son Hunter to serve as a board member. Republicans question whether Hunter Biden's highly paid job created a conflict of interest for his father as the former vice president worked on Ukraine policy in the Obama administration.


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