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  • Runners in the first wave break from the start on rain soaked streets during the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass., Monday, April 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)

  • Bicycle-mounted police officers pass a Boston Special Operations K-9 police officer and his dog as they patrol at the finish line before the 122nd Boston Marathon on Monday, April 16, 2018, in Boston. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

  • The elite men runners break from the starting line during the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass., Monday, April 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)

  • Athletes wait under a tent at the athlete's village for the start of the the 122nd Boston Marathon on Monday, April 16, 2018, in Hopkinton, Mass. (AP Photo/Jennifer McDermott)

  • Marcel Hug, of Switzerland, lifts the trophy after winning the men's wheelchair division of the 122nd Boston Marathon on Monday, April 16, 2018, in Boston. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

  • Connor Buchholz, 25, of Toledo, Ohio, waits under a tent beside ice crystals that accumulated at the athlete's village, before the precipitation turned to rain, before the start of the the 122nd Boston Marathon on Monday, April 16, 2018, in Hopkinton, Mass. (AP Photo/Jennifer McDermott)

  • Spectators at Wellesley College cheer on runners during the 122nd Boston Marathon on Monday, April 16, 2018, in Wellesley, Mass. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

  • ATF K-9 units cross the start line during a security patrol before the start of the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass., Monday, April 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)

  • The field of men's elite runners leave the starting line in the 122nd Boston Marathon on Monday, April 16, 2018, in Hopkinton, Mass. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

  • Evans Chebet, of Kenya, leads Yuki Kawauchi, of Japan, as the men's elite field of runners compete in the 122nd Boston Marathon on Monday, April 16, 2018, in Ashland, Mass. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

  • The elite female runners break from the starting line in a downpour during the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass., Monday, April 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)

  • Boston Marathon bombing hero Carlos Arredondo, left, joins others as they break from the start in the mobility impaired runner division of the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass., Monday, April 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)

  • Cherry Scanzaroli, of Hopedale, Mass., holds a rainbow umbrella as she waits to cheer on runners at the start of the 122nd running of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass., Monday, April 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm)

  • Tatyana McFadden, of the United States, crosses the finish line to win the women's wheelchair division of the 122nd Boston Marathon on Monday, April 16, 2018, in Boston. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Monday, April 16, 2018 12:40 pm

USA's Linden wins wet, windy Boston Marathon

Associated Press

BOSTON -- Desiree Linden splashed her way through icy rain and a near-gale headwind to a Boston Marathon victory on Monday, the first U.S. woman to win the race since 1985.

The two-time Olympian and 2011 Boston runner-up pulled away at the end of Heartbreak Hill and ran alone through Brookline to finish in an unofficial time of 2 hours, 39 minutes, 54 seconds. That's the slowest time for a women's winner since 1978.

A field of 30,000 runners fought drenching rain, temperatures in the mid-30s and gusts of up to 32 mph on the 26.2-mile trek from Hopkinton to Copley Square.

A crowd of fans —thinned and muffled by the weather— greeted Linden with chants of "U-S-A!"

Japanese runner Yuki Kawauchi surged late to win the men's race in an unofficial time of 2 hours, 15 minutes and 58 seconds.

Kawauchi is the first Japanese man to win the Boston Marathon since 1987. He overtook Kenyan runner Geoffrey Kirui in the last few miles to win his first Abbott World Marathon major title.

Kawauchi said through an interpreter after the windy, rainy race that it was the best conditions possible.

Tatyana McFadden won the women's wheelchair race.

The 28-year-old from Maryland crossed the finish line on Boylston Street on Monday in an official time of 2 hour, 4 minutes, 39 seconds. It was the slowest winning time in 30 years. It gives McFadden five Boston Marathon wins and a record-setting 22 victories in the Abbott World Marathon Majors series.

The Russian-born McFadden says she's overwhelmed after winning what she knew would be a tough race. She also won this year's women's wheelchair race at the Chicago Marathon.

Marcel Hug won the men's wheelchair race for a fourth consecutive year.

The 32-year-old from Switzerland took a commanding lead in the second half of the race and held it to finish in an unofficial time of 1 hour, 46 minutes, 26 seconds. It was the slowest winning time in the men's wheelchair race in 31 years.

Hug says it was tough and "freezing" and he's just glad to have finished.

For more on this story, visit www.journalgazette.net later today or see Tuesday's print edition of The Journal Gazette.

Linden's Fort Wayne appearance

To see a January story from Desiree Linden's appearance in Fort Wayne, click on this URL --

http://www.journalgazette.net/sports/20180129/marathoner-makes-time-for-visit