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The Journal Gazette

Friday, October 13, 2017 1:00 am

Nation

NC prison escape attempt deadly

Associated Press

ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. – Two North Carolina prison employees were killed and several others hurt after inmates at a sewing plant started a fire in an unsuccessful escape attempt Thursday, authorities said.

How the employees were killed at the Pasquotank Correctional Institution in Elizabeth City was not released.

At least 10 people were taken to hospitals after the fire about 3 p.m. Thursday, Sentara Albemarle Medical Center spokesman Peter Sengenberger said. He did not have a breakdown of whether they were employees or inmates.

The inmates started the fire at a Correction Enterprises sewing plant inside prison walls. The plant makes safety vests and embroidered items, Prison spokesman Keith Acree said in a statement.

Prison workers did several counts after the fire and all 725 inmates were accounted for, Acree said.

Texas executes inmate for 1999 slaying

A Texas inmate convicted in the death of a prison guard was executed Thursday after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected his lawyers' attempts to halt the punishment.

Robert Pruett was given a lethal injection for the fatal attack on corrections officer Daniel Nagle in December 1999 at a prison southeast of San Antonio.

Prosecutors have said the stabbing stemmed from a dispute over a peanut butter sandwich that Pruett wanted to take into a recreation yard against prison rules.

Website glitch no hack, Equifax says

Equifax said Thursday that problems with an online customer help page were caused by a vendor's software code and not by a cyberattack on its systems.

The company earlier said it had disabled its credit report assistance page after reports that another part of its website had been hacked.

Equifax Inc. is dealing with the aftermath of hackers breaking into its system earlier this year that exposed the personal information of 145.5 million Americans.

Most see climate change in storms

After hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria blitzed the nation, most Americans think weather disasters are getting more severe and see global warming's fingerprints.

A new poll from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 68 percent of Americans think weather disasters seem to be worsening, compared with 28 percent who think they are staying the same and only 4 percent who say they are less severe.

And 46 percent of those who think it's getting worse blame man-made climate change mostly or solely for the wild weather, while another 39 percent say it's a combination of global warming and natural variability.