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The Journal Gazette

  • Voters wait in line on election day after an order issued in Fulton County Superior Court ordered the polling location to remain open until 10 p.m., a full three hours after polls closed statewide, in Atlanta, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

  • Voters wait in line on election day after an order issued in Fulton County Superior Court ordered the polling location to remain open until 10 p.m., a full three hours after polls closed statewide, in Atlanta, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

  • Mylandria Ponder, 26, is a would-be first-time voter who went to the her polling place in Atlanta on Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2018, but left after waiting 80 minutes and not yet casting a ballot. (AP Photo/Janelle Cogan)

  • Tyra Moreland, with the Georgia Department of Elections, directs voters away from their usual polling place at an Atlanta library to a new one about two miles away. (AP Photo/Janelle Cogan)

  • A poll worker tapes a door shut as it closes at 10 p.m., a full three hours after polls closed statewide, in Atlanta, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Wednesday, November 07, 2018 12:50 pm

Broken voting machines, long lines under scrutiny in Georgia

Associated Press

 

ATLANTA – Malfunctioning voting machines, missing power cords and hours-long lines at the polls are being scrutinized by candidates and election officials in Georgia, where the governor's race is still undecided as votes are still being tallied.

Democrat Stacey Abrams is vying to become the nation's first female black governor, but trails Republican Brian Kemp, who is Georgia's Secretary of State and chief elections official.

Some of the obstacles to voting happened in diverse cities in metropolitan Atlanta which typically lean Democratic. And some of the longest lines were at polling places around historically black colleges in Atlanta.

Multiple lawsuits have been filed in the contentious race.

Voting rights groups say Kemp has sought to suppress the minority vote in Georgia, but he has fiercely denied such accusations.