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The Journal Gazette

Sunday, June 23, 2019 1:00 am

Warsaw boasts world-class restaurants

Josh Patterson | For The Journal Gazette

About Warsaw

Population: 14,941 (2018 census estimate)

County: Kosciusko

Founded: 1836

• Warsaw was named after the capital of Poland in honor of Kosciusko County being named after a Polish nobleman.

• Kosciusko has more than 100 lakes, and Warsaw borders many of them.

Warsaw certainly earned its moniker as the “Orthopedic Capital of the World.” The Kosciusko County seat serves as home to DePuy Manufacturing, the world's first orthopedic device manufacturer, as well as competitor Zimmer Biomet Holdings.

However, keep searching the city of nearly 15,000 denizens and you'll notice other world-class offerings available.

Boasting operations in the United States and Europe, Da-Lite Screen Co. also houses its headquarters in the Lake City. Warsaw's community feel plays an integral role in what Da-Lite seeks to instill in employees worldwide, said Matthew Graham, vice president of product management.

“There is an abundance of local activities,” Graham said. “Whether you want to relax on a lake, attend a festival, participate in a triathlon, or get involved in community service, it's easy to achieve a work/life balance. Da-Lite has really prospered with the team we have built over the years. Growing a business in a small town simply extends your family.”

That global sense also manifests in a pair of Warsaw restaurants: Noa Noa Wood Grill & Sushi Bar and One Ten Craft Meatery. At Noa Noa, locals get whisked away to a place befitting a Caribbean resort – complete with sand volleyball courts at the adjoining Spikes Beach Grill.

Patrons “love that we offer a fresh seafood variety,” Noa Noa manager Laura Barros said. “We're unusual in that regard, that we can get seafood so fresh. We get it overnighted from the East Coast. We get a lot of lake clientele, and they just love having this little tropical paradise in the middle of Indiana.”

Although the meat offered by One Ten stands as more of the grass-fed variety, owner Jason Davis' travels to both coasts forged an inner passion to shift a non-local's paradigm of what Warsaw represents.

“Once a year, people drove tractors to my high school,” Davis said. “That was a thing that we did, and you didn't know that it was unique until you left. Warsaw has really unique demographics, and we wanted to boast about what made Warsaw as unique as it was.

“A New Yorker that works for Zimmer or Biomet looks at Warsaw and thinks one thing. When you come in from New York, you may be in Warsaw but you're not going to feel like you're in the Warsaw that you thought you knew.”