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  • Schnatter FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017, file photo, Papa John's founder and CEO John Schnatter attends a meeting in Louisville, Ky. Schnatter is apologizing after reportedly using a racial slur during a conference call in May 2018. The apology Wednesday, July 11, 2018, comes after Forbes cited an anonymous source saying the pizza chain's marketing firm broke ties with the company afterward. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)

Thursday, July 12, 2018 1:00 am

Nation/world

Papa John's founder apologizes for slur

News Services

NEW YORK – Papa John's founder John Schnatter is apologizing after reportedly using a racial slur during a conference call in May.

The apology Wednesday comes after Forbes cited an anonymous source saying the pizza chain's marketing firm broke ties with the company afterward.

Forbes said Schnatter used the N-word during a media training exercise. When asked how he would distance himself from racist groups, Schnatter reportedly complained that Colonel Sanders never faced a backlash for using the word.

The University of Louisville also said Wednesday that Schnatter resigned from its board of trustees, effective immediately.

CDC joins probe of mystery ailments

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has joined the investigation into the sonic incidents that have injured U.S. diplomats and have confounded U.S. officials and scientists since first discovered last year in Cuba.

Ambassador Kenneth Merten, an acting principal deputy assistant secretary of state, told the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Wednesday that the CDC has joined a task force created by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

The addition of CDC reflects the ongoing trouble the United States is having trying to determine the cause of the incidents that have left more than 25 Americans and U.S. personnel experiencing headaches, hearing loss and other mysterious ailments in Cuba and China.

House speaker defends Jim Jordan

House Speaker Paul Ryan defended Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan on Wednesday as Jordan faces allegations he ignored sexual abuse while he was a college wrestling coach.

Jordan is facing allegations from multiple former wrestlers at Ohio State University that he ignored stories of sexual abuse by team physician Dr. Richard Strauss. Jordan was an assistant wrestling coach from 1986 to 1994. On Wednesday, an eighth wrestler told CNN that Jordan knew about Strauss' abuse.

“Jim Jordan is a friend of mine,” Ryan said. “We haven't always agreed with each other over the years. But I've always known Jim Jordan to be a man of honesty and a man of integrity.”

Kasich wants to regulate farm runoff

Ohio's governor is calling for regulations on thousands of farms as part of a new strategy to minimize the fertilizer and manure that flows into streams and feeds persistent toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie.

Gov. John Kasich's order calls for issuing “distressed watershed” designations for eight creeks and rivers in northwestern Ohio that are the source for large amounts of phosphorus-rich fertilizer and manure. Those designations would then require farmers to evaluate their land and make changes.

If approved by the state's soil and water commission, the eight designated areas would affect nearly 2 million acres and an estimated 7,000 farms, according to the state's agriculture department.