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The Journal Gazette

  • This Friday, Oct. 26, 2018, photo shows the camera on the back of the Red Hydrogen One smartphone in New York. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

  • This Friday, Oct. 26, 2018, photo shows the camera on the back of the Red Hydrogen One smartphone in New York. The new Hydrogen One has a holographic screen that produces 3-D visuals without needing special glasses. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

  • This Friday, Oct. 26, 2018, photo shows the Red Hydrogen One smartphone in New York. The new Hydrogen One has a holographic screen that produces 3-D visuals without needing special glasses. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

  • This Friday, Oct. 26, 2018, photo shows the Red Hydrogen One smartphone in New York. The new Hydrogen One has a holographic screen that produces 3-D visuals without needing special glasses. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

  • In this Oct. 16, 2018, photo Red founder Jim Jannard listens during an event in New York. Red's new Hydrogen One has a holographic screen that produces 3-D visuals without needing special glasses. (AP Photo/Nick Jesdanun)

Monday, October 29, 2018 9:20 am

Can a holographic screen help a new phone break out?

ANICK JESDANUN | Associated Press

NEW YORK – Most leading phones offer the same basics: Big screens, decent battery life and good cameras. But standing out from the crowd isn't easy, even when a phone offers innovative features.

One such smartphone launches this week from Red, a company with roots in movie cameras. Its Hydrogen One has a holographic screen that produces 3-D visuals without making you wear special glasses.

The challenge will be finding customers beyond gadget elitists. The phone's $1,295 price tag won't help.

But makers like Red face a bigger problem: Phones aren't just about the hardware these days. Chipping away at Apple's and Samsung's dominance is much harder because so much phone innovation these days is a matter of software and artificial intelligence.