Skip to main content

The Journal Gazette

  • Associated Press Ruth Goodrich of Goodrich's Maple Farm in Danville, Vt., holds squirrel-damaged maple sap tubing, right, and new tubing, left, in the farm's equipment shop.

Friday, March 15, 2019 1:00 am

Squirrels disrupting maple syrup supply

Associated Press

DANVILLE, Vt. – Maple syrup producers have more than the weather to worry about. Frenetic squirrels are chomping on equipment, crimping the flow of sap at some operations.

Damage from wildlife – deer, bear woodpeckers, and squirrels – is not unusual for maple producers, but this year an abundant population of squirrels is disrupting plastic sap tubing and spouts at some sugaring operations in New England.

That means producers must go out into sometimes deep snow to find and replace the damaged lines that transport the sap from the maple trees or other chewed or missing equipment, which producers say can be time-consuming and expensive.

“Occasionally they declare war. And it seems like they have this year,” said Ruth Goodrich of Goodrich's Maple Farm in Danville, Vermont, the largest maple producing state.

The boom in the squirrel population is mostly tied to an increase in food source, such as acorns and other mast from trees, said Mark Isselstadt, maple specialist with the University of Vermont Extension. But the squirrels aren't causing problems for all producers, he said.

Lyle Merrifield of Gorham, Maine, said he's had to fix about 60 spots in his operation damaged by the chomping critters.

The trouble is the squirrels could take one bite of tubing and move another 100 feet, where they could take another bite, making the damage hard to find, said Merrifield, who is president of the Maine Maple Producers Association.

“I've heard a lot of people talk about squirrel damage, so it's probably the worst we've seen, combined with the deep snow, just that combination,” he said.