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  • Associated Press Families shop at a mall in Miami last year. After years of sluggish growth, typical U.S. household incomes in 2016 topped pre-recession levels, according to the Census Bureau.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017 1:00 am

Household incomes hit new high

Census report finds earnings last year topped 2007 figures

CHRISTOPHER RUGABER | Associated Press

WASHINGTON – In a stark reminder of the damage done by the Great Recession and of the modest recovery that followed, the median American household only last year finally earned more than it did in 1999.

Incomes for a typical U.S. household, adjusted for inflation, rose 3.2 percent from 2015 to 2016 to $59,039, the Census Bureau said. The median is the point at which half the households fall below and half are above.

Last year's figure is slightly above the previous peak of $58,665, reached in 1999. It is also the first time since the recession ended in 2009 that the typical household earned more than it did in 2007, when the recession began.

Trudi Renwick, the bureau's assistant division chief, cautioned that the census in 2013 changed how it asks households about income, making historical comparisons less than precise.

Still, the Census data is closely watched because of its comprehensive nature. It is based on interviews with 70,000 households and includes detailed data on incomes and poverty across a range of demographic groups.

Elise Gould, a senior economist at the Economic Policy Institute, said that adjusting for the change in methodology, median income still remains below its 1999 peak. However, she added that the Census report shows that American households have made some significant economic progress in 2015 and 2016.

“We are definitely pulling ourselves out of the deep hole of the Great Recession,” Gould said on a conference call with reporters.

Median household income rose $4,641, or 8.5 percent, from 2014 through 2016. That's the best two-year gain on records dating to 1967, according to analysts at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Yet that improvement comes after a steep recession and a slow recovery that left most American households with barely any income increases. The lack of meaningful raises has left many people feeling left behind economically, a sentiment that factored into the 2016 elections.