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The Journal Gazette

  • Lisa Green | The Journal Gazette: About 3,000 people are attending the Global Leadership Summit at Memorial Coliseum, the largest satellite site based on attendance.

  • Lisa Green | The Journal Gazette: A vendor area at the Coliseum includes local businesses, nonprofits, universities and colleges, as well as an array of books from Summit speakers who are best-selling authors.

Friday, August 09, 2019 12:48 pm

Leadership summit: Everyone has ability to lead

Lisa Green | The Journal Gazette

Leadership isn't about status or position. The privilege and responsibility is all-inclusive.

That was one of the messages during the two-day Global Leadership Summit that began Thursday.

Sweetwater Sound CEO Chuck Surack said the training offered benefits everyone.

“We all have influence and we all have the ability to lead,” Surack said.

About 3,000 people are viewing the Summit at Fort Wayne's Memorial Coliseum. The local venue attracts the largest crowd of satellite sites viewing the stream from the host campus of Willow Creek Community Church in the Chicago suburb of South Barrington, Illinois.

Sweetwater Sound executive Kelly Byrd, a key local organizer, on Thursday said the local satellite began 17 years ago at Blackhawk Church when he was pastor there, and just more than 200 people attended the first year.

The Fort Wayne site received a “shout out” Thursday from Craig Groeschel, pastor, best-selling author and Summit Champion. Groeschel gave the opening session from the stage in South Barrington, Illinois.

More than 400,000 people in more than 135 countries were expected to attend this year, according to a program welcome statement from Tom De Vries, president and CEO of the Global Leadership Network.

Friday's speakers included Aja Brown, mayor of Compton, California, and Chris Voss, former FBI negotiator and CEO and founder of the consulting group The Black Swan Group.

Brown, the youngest person to be elected Compton's mayor, said vision, buy-in, timing and collaboration are part of catalytic change. Sometimes circumstances force it.

“People are more apt to change when system failure is imminent,” she said.

lisagreen@jg.net