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Associated Press photos
One step to eco-dying is to scatter plant materials all over a pre-wetted (and mordanted) scarf.

Making natural dyes easier than you think

An eco-dyed scarf is unique to both the dyer as well as the plants used to create the natural dye.
An eco scarf that was made in a tie-dye fashion. Tied up in random places with rubber bands, it was placed into a eucalyptus bath for a natural dye.

Homegrown botanical dyes are in, part of today’s shift toward more natural and organic living.

And you don’t need a degree in chemistry to create your own hues for scarves, sweaters or even Easter eggs.

All it takes is a garden plot or a few pots and a kitchen.

“If you’re already gardening or already even have a landscape, you can look out your window and you can use the things that are there, that you’re already growing, for a dyer’s garden,” says Chris McLaughlin, a gardener in Placerville, California, and author of the new book “A Garden to Dye For: How to Use Plants from the Garden to Create Natural Colors for Fabrics and Fibers” (St. Lynn’s Press).

Where to start?

If you’re planting a new dye garden, McLaughlin’s book contains several different garden plans. An edible dye garden, for example, might be best if you have limited space and can’t justify giving up square footage for anything other than fruits and veggies. Suggested plants include carrots, bee balm, rosemary, purple basil, red onions, chamomile, beets, blueberries, red cabbage and marjoram.

A cutting dye garden features flowers that can be cut for indoor display or tossed in the dye pot. McLaughlin recommends roses, hollyhocks, dahlias, rudbeckia, purple coneflowers, zinnias and cosmos.

Of course, you can always mix veggies and flowers, or plant a few items in containers.

And if you’re already gardening, chances are you have some of these plants and flowers in your backyard.

“Even a typical suburban landscape that was planted by the housing developer might have birch, juniper, roses, Japanese maple or eucalyptus,” McLaughlin says.

For beginners, French marigolds and onions (red or yellow) are easy to grow and produce vivid colors for dyes, according to Julie Jensen, farmer and founder of Echoview Farm and Fiber Mill near Asheville, North Carolina.

Which plants for which colors?

Appearance isn’t everything. The vibrant pink flowers of the peony, for example, result in a pale lime green when used for dye, according to Howard Freilich, founder of Blondie’s Treehouse, a landscaping service in New York.

Here’s a list of his favorite sources for various hues:

Beets (roots) – deep red

Rose (hips) – red

Lilac (twigs) – yellow/orange

Golden Rod (flowers) – yellow

Coneflower (flowers) – brownish green; (leaves and stems) – gold

Ivy (twigs) – yellow/brown

Onion (skin) – orange

Carrot (roots) – orange

Foxglove (flowers) – apple green

Peppermint (leaves) – dark khaki green

Peony (flowers) – pale lime green

Hyacinth (flowers) – blue

Purple Iris (flowers) – blue

Hibiscus (flowers, dark red or purple) – red-purple

Oregano (dried stalk) – deep brown/black

Iris (roots) – black

Growing tips

A dye garden doesn’t require any more work than a typical garden. But Freilich notes that dye content in plants is significantly influenced by temperature, humidity and sun exposure.

“So you want to make sure that the plant is growing in its ideal condition,” he says.

McLaughlin recommends leaving at least 4 feet of space around the beds to make it easier to harvest and tend to the plants and flowers. That leaves room for wheelbarrows and other equipment.

Harvesting tips

Blossoms should be in full bloom, and berries and nuts ripe when harvesting plants for dyes, according to Freilich.

As for roots, the dye content increases as the plant ages. However, most of the plants that contain dyes in their roots are perennials, and will take two to three years to develop enough dye for harvesting, he says.

If picking an entire plant or leaves, do so at the end of their growing season so the dye content is at its peak.

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