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nation/world

Suit filed over auctioned Oscar

– The organization that hosts the Academy Awards has sued over the recent auction of a 1942 Oscar awarded to the art director of “My Gal Sal” and is seeking to buy back the statuette for $10.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences filed the lawsuit Tuesday against Rhode Island-based Briarbrook Auction Services.

Briarbrook sold the Oscar for $79,200 on June 24. The academy adopted a rule in 1951 prohibiting winners or their heirs from selling Oscars. It is seeking an order requiring Briarbrook to sell it the Oscar for $10 in accordance with the academy bylaws.

Nation

One-fourth of US citizens in poverty

A fourth of all Americans live in what the Census Bureau calls “poverty areas,” neighborhoods where at least 1 in 5 have incomes below the poverty level, according to a new report.

The share of people living in these poverty areas fell during the 1990s but grew substantially over the first decade of the 2000s. As of 2010, it is up to 25.7 percent, from 18.1 percent in 2000. In 1990, it was 20 percent.

NSA probes called reasonable: Study

The first time the bipartisan Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board dissected a National Security Agency surveillance program, it found fundamental flaws, arguing in a January report that the NSA’s collection of domestic calling records “lacked a viable legal foundation” and should be shut down.

But in its latest study, the board takes the opposite view of a different set of NSA programs revealed last year.

The new report found that the NSA’s collection of Internet data within the United States passes constitutional muster and employs “reasonable” safeguards designed to protect the rights of Americans.

Bourbon St. victim dies; 1 arrested

One of the 10 victims of a Sunday shooting on New Orleans’ Bourbon Street has died.

Louisiana State Police Superintendent Mike Edmonson asked for a moment of silence after announcing the death Wednesday of the 21-year-old woman from Hammond.

A man identified by Louisiana police as a “person of interest” in connection with the shooting turned himself in Wednesday and has been jailed on unrelated charges.

Accused stabber ruled incompetent

Doctors believe that one of the two 12-year-old Wisconsin girls accused of stabbing a classmate to please a fictional character is not mentally competent to stand trial, attorneys said Wednesday.

The prosecution immediately requested a hearing to assess whether the girl is capable of assisting in her own defense.

Prosecutors also asked that the girl be given a separate evaluation to determine whether she had mental disease at the time of the crime.

World

Sarkozy alleges ‘humiliation’

Former President Nicolas Sarkozy has accused France’s justice system of trying to “humiliate” and “destroy” him, after he was charged in a corruption probe that could spell trouble for his future political ambitions.

The former conservative party leader fought back in a broadcast interview Wednesday, just hours after his release from questioning over an investigation into judicial allegations that he took $67 million in illegal campaign funds from Libya’s Moammar Gadhafi.

Japan to lift some N. Korea sanctions

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Thursday that his government has decided to lift some of its sanctions on North Korea.

The move is in return for North Korea’s agreement to reinvestigate the fate of Japanese who were abducted by North Korean agents in the 1970s and 1980s.

Japan bans port calls by any North Korean-flag vessels, all trade with North Korea and the entry into Japan of North Korean citizens. Tokyo has said that if its concerns are satisfied, it would allow more people exchanges, ease requirements to report money transfers to the North and raise limits on how much cash can be carried to the North.

Benghazi suspect lawyer builds case

A lawyer for a Libyan militant charged in the 2012 Benghazi attacks said Wednesday that she had seen no evidence tying her client to the violence, but a judge nonetheless directed Ahmed Abu Khattala to remain in custody as the Justice Department builds its case against him.

The lawyer conceded that Abu Khattala had no reasonable chance of being released at the moment, given the terrorism-related charge he faces and his lack of ties to the United States.

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