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Houseful suggests human smuggling

– A house overflowing with more than 100 people presumed to be in the U.S. illegally was uncovered just outside Houston on Wednesday, a police spokesman said.

The suspected stash house was found during a search for a 24-year-old woman and her two children, a 7-year-old girl and a 5-year-old boy, who were reported missing by relatives late Tuesday, said John Cannon, a spokesman for the Houston Police Department. Many people in the home, which authorities said appeared to be part of a human smuggling operation, were dressed only in undergarments and were sitting in filthy conditions, Cannon said.

Kentucky tables same-sex ruling

A federal judge is giving Kentucky more time to officially recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states and countries, saying doing so will allow the law to become settled without causing confusion or granting rights only to have them taken away.

The ruling Wednesday came just two days before gay couples would have been allowed to change their names on official identifications and documents and obtain the benefits of any other married couple in Kentucky.

U.S. District Judge John G. Heyburn II of Louisville said in a four-page order that it is “best that these momentous changes occur upon full review” rather than being implemented too soon or causing confusing changes.

Army general fate delayed to today

A general who broke military law repeatedly during a three-year extramarital affair with a subordinate should be thrown out of the Army and lose his benefits, prosecutors said Wednesday.

The defense argued that dismissing Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair from the military would do the most harm to his wife and children, calling them the only innocent people in the case.

After both sides finished, Judge Col. James Pohl adjourned the hearing until this morning – meaning Sinclair had to wait at least one more day to learn his fate.

Mega Millions jackpot to be split

The holders of two lucky tickets purchased states apart awoke to good news Wednesday: They will split a Mega Millions jackpot of $414 million, the third-largest prize in the game’s history.

The tickets – one sold at a Sunoco convenience store on Florida’s Space Coast, the other at a Maryland liquor store southeast of Washington – matched all six winning numbers in the Tuesday night drawing: 11, 19, 24, 33 and 51 with a Mega Ball of 7.

The full $414 million jackpot has a cash option of $230.9 million. Maryland lotto officials estimate that if its winner takes the cash option, he or she will take home about $76.4 million after taxes.

Texas obtains new set of lethal drugs

Texas has obtained a new batch of the drugs it uses to execute death row inmates, allowing the state to continue carrying out death sentences after its existing supply expires at the end of the month.

But correction officials will not say where they bought the drugs, arguing that information must be kept secret to protect the safety of the supplier.

The decision to keep details about the drugs and their source secret puts the agency at odds with past rulings of the state attorney general’s office, which has said the state’s open records law requires the agency to disclose specifics about the drugs it uses to carry out lethal injections.

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