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Letters

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Letters

‘Empty soul’ comment unintentionally revealing

One of the more notable addresses offered at the recent CPAC conference was given by Rep. Paul Ryan, the noted Republican policy wonk, whose concepts on assisting the poor and hungry always seem to revolve around ways to render them substantially more poor and hungry – for their own good, of course.

On this occasion he chose to attack school lunch programs for low-income children using some spurious story about the uplifting qualities of a “brown bag” lunch brought from home, as if an empty bag brought from a home with no food in it would be preferable to actual food. Ryan accused Democrats of leaving children with “full stomachs and empty souls.”

If the congressman truly believes his own ideas, I would suggest he demonstrate their effectiveness by withholding food from his own children and reporting back to us on the subsequent improvement in their souls.

I will give Ryan credit for his considerable expertise on the subject of empty souls. He has once again proved that he is himself the proud possessor of one of the emptiest souls on this planet.

ELAINE FAZZARO Fort Wayne

Energy policies contribute to clean, healthy Indiana

Vince Griffin’s letter to the editor “Anti-coal strategy is harmful to Indiana” (March 11) is filled with fallacies.

Blaming potentially higher consumer energy costs on the Environmental Protection Agency and our current president is ridiculous. The bottom line is that all costs for energy companies cut into their profit margin. The energy companies want to maintain economic growth, so their costs are passed on to the consumer.

Further, Griffin argues that new regulations will be expensive and affect all consumers. I suggest that consumers will continue to bear the cost after the energy companies have finished exploiting our environment. We can look to West Virginia and North Carolina and the damage done to the water supplies by coal ash, coal chemicals and air pollution. Guess who pays for the clean up – taxpayers!

I suggest that Griffin read two excellent works by Stephen M. Meyer, a noted MIT professor: “The Economic Impact of Environmental Regulation” and “Environmental Protection and Economic Prosperity.” Stop with political scare tactics and right-wing rhetoric in regard to our state of Indiana. Let’s bring in companies that believe in protecting our resources instead of taking what they can get and running.

I prefer to live in a clean, healthy Indiana rather then a toxic waste dump.

JANE RITCHHART Fort Wayne

Gun handling violated basic rules of safety

As many of us try to and would like to make the world a safer place through awareness and education on gun safety, I was appalled at the front-page picture in The Journal Gazette on March 7. Auburn Mayor Norm Yoder appears to be pointing a Thompson submachine gun at FBI Special Agent Robert Allen Jones’s head, and with his finger on the trigger, no less.

Gun safety Rule No. 1: Never point a gun at anyone unless you intend to shoot them, no matter how old the gun, or whether you think the gun is loaded or not.

A lot of people have been shot and killed with a gun that was “unloaded.” One bullet could be in the chamber. Even if you see there are no bullets and the chamber is open and clear, you still make sure the barrel never is in line with anyone.

ROGER LINDLEY Fort Wayne

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