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Music

  • Seger taking classics, new tunes on the road
    NEW YORK – At 69, Bob Seger says he's ready to hit the road again: He's scaled back smoking and bicycles 10 miles a day as part of a workout routine.
  • Seger taking classics, new tunes on the road
    NEW YORK – At 69, Bob Seger says he’s ready to hit the road again: He’s scaled back smoking and bicycles 10 miles a day as part of a workout routine.
  • Inside Philharmonic rehearsal
      Editor’s note: The Journal Gazette was given an opportunity to view the behind-the-scenes rehearsal of the Fort Wayne Philharmonic as the musicians prepared for opening night on Sept. 27.
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Freshcut

‘The Hunger Games: Catching Fire’ Various

Choosing the tracks for “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” soundtrack must have been a mini-Hunger Games in itself after the wild success of the first film. The victors offer a mix of indie and mainstream, adding a rounded, energetic and emotional dimension to the film.

The twelve tributes (fifteen on the deluxe edition) of album No. 2 battle it out to discover who puts out the edgiest, yet accessible, song in homage to the story. One can see a shift in tone from the first film’s T Bone Burnett-produced soundtrack from folky melancholy to a slicker, more eccentric offering supervised by Alexandra Patsavas.

A few traces from the original DNA remain with such tracks as the folky “Lean” by The National, “Devil May Cry” by The Weeknd and the dulcet tones of “Gale Song” by The Lumineers. The lead single “Atlas,” from British rockers Coldplay, brings a low simmer resignation to boil over into anger.

But the indie performers modulate their voices in a different direction – instead of reassuring, revolutionary tones they all go eerie synth. Teen sensation Lorde does an underwater-sounding cover of Tears for Fears’ “Everybody Wants to Rule the World” that takes its original cheerful spirit and twists it into a macabre warning.

There’s no clear victor on this record, apart from the fan.

– Cristina Jaleru, Associated Press

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