You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

World

  • At least 1 dead reported in Turkish gas explosion
    ANKARA, Turkey – Officials say a gas explosion in southwestern Turkey has killed one person and injured 25 others.
  • In Israel, Iron Dome changes battle
    Israel’s “Iron Dome” defense system has emerged as a game-changer in the current round of violence with Hamas militants in the Gaza Strip, shooting down dozens of incoming rockets and being credited with preventing numerous civilian casualties.
  • Lebanese rockets hit Israel in offensive’s 4th day
     JERUSALEM – Gaza rocket fire struck a gas station and set it ablaze Friday in southern Israel, seriously wounding one person as rocket fire also came from Lebanon for the first time in the four-day offensive.
Advertisement
Associated Press
Lebanese policemen extinguish burned cars, at the scene where two explosions have struck near the Iranian Embassy killing several, in Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

Suicide blasts near Iran Embassy in Beirut kill 23

Associated Press
Lebanese men run to remove dead bodies from burned cars, at the scene where two explosions have struck near the Iranian Embassy killing several, in Beirut, Lebanon, Tuesday. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

– BEIRUT – Two suicide bombers detonated explosions outside the Iranian Embassy on Tuesday, killing 23 people, including the Iranian cultural attaché, apparently in retaliation for the Lebanese group Hezbollah's support of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

The bombings appeared to be another strike in an intensifying proxy battle about Syria's civil war that is rattling its smaller neighbor Lebanon.

An al-Qaida-linked Sunni extremist group claimed responsibility for the attack, saying more would follow unless the Iranian-backed Shiite Hezbollah withdraws fighters that have helped Assad's military score key victories over Syrian rebels.

The midmorning blasts hit the upscale neighborhood of Janah, a Hezbollah stronghold, leaving bodies and pools of blood on the glass-strewn street amid burning cars. More than 140 people were wounded, officials said.

A Lebanese security official said the first suicide attacker was on a motorcycle that carried 4.4 pounds of explosives. He blew himself up at the large black main gate of the Iranian mission, damaging the three-story facility, the official said.

Less than two minutes later, a second suicide attacker driving a car rigged with 110 pounds of explosives struck about 10 yards away, the official said. He spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity in line with regulations.

The bombing was one of the deadliest in a string of attacks that have targeted Hezbollah strongholds in Lebanon in recent months in a campaign of retaliation by Sunni radicals over its backing of Assad in Syria's bloody conflict, now in its third year.

In recent weeks, Hezbollah fighters have backed Assad's troops in a series of victories over rebels, taking back a string of rebel-held towns in Syria. Shiite Iran is the main Mideast backer of Assad's government, believed to be providing it with key financing and weapons.

Senior Hezbollah official Mahmoud Komati told reporters at the scene that the attacks were a direct result of the "successive defeats suffered by (extremists) in Syria."

He described the blasts as a "message of blood and death" to Iran and Hezbollah for standing by Syria, vowing they would not alter their position.

Lebanon's sectarian divisions have been inflamed by the war next door. Lebanese Sunnis largely back the rebellion and Shiites largely support Assad – and the tensions have repeated flared into clashes and bloodshed in Lebanon.

Iran's Foreign Minister blamed Israel for the attacks. Hezbollah and Syrian officials indirectly blamed Saudi Arabia, the Sunni Arab kingdom that along with fellow Gulf nation Qatar has been a major backer of Syria's rebels.

"Each of the terrorist attacks that strike in Lebanon, Syria and Iraq reek of petrodollars," a Syrian government statement said, in a clear reference to oil-rich Gulf Arab countries.

A Lebanese al-Qaida-linked group, the Abdullah Azzam Brigades, claimed responsibility for Tuesday's attacks, saying they would continue until Hezbollah withdraws its forces from Syria.

The authenticity of the claim could not be independently verified, but it was posted on a militant website and on the Twitter account of Sirajuddin Zurayqat, a spokesman of the Azzam Brigades.

The group is active in southern Lebanon and has issued claims in the past for rocket attacks into northern Israel. It has also claimed a July 2010 bombing of a Japanese oil tanker in the Persian Gulf and a 2005 rocket attack that narrowly missed a U.S. amphibious assault ship docked at Jordan's Aqaba Red Sea resort.

In 2011, the Obama administration added a senior member of the group, Saudi citizen Saleh al-Qarawi, to the list of global terrorists subject to U.S. sanctions.

Associated Press writers Bassem Mroue and Zeina Karam in Beirut, Maamoun Youssef in Cairo and Albert Aji in Damascus contributed to this report.

Advertisement