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ARCH adds 4 sites to endangered roster

ARCH, the historic preservation organization, has released its annual list of endangered architectural assets in the city and announced winners of its annual ARCHie Awards for preservation efforts. The endangered property list rose to 12 from eight in 2012.

Joel and Ellen Sauer were honored for single-family rehabilitation for the rehab of their home at 1110 W. Washington Blvd.

Home Replay received a commendation for single-family rehabilitation for its work on the home at 1105 Garden St.

Metro Realty/Brian Schaper received the award for commercial rehabilitation for their rehabilitation of a commercial building at 2219 Broadway.

Thomas and Lois Eubank received a commendation for commercial rehabilitation for rehabbing a commercial building at 4005 South Wayne Ave.

A special award for preservation went to Robert and Pam Michel for the restoration of 1753 W. Main St. and the restoration of the Findlay Fort Wayne and Western Railroad depot.

The list of endangered properties:

•The Brookville-Irvington Park Neighborhood, threatened by a public works project that could result in demolition of houses.

•Historic roadside architecture, including the Hillcrest Theater sign, which was rescued and moved to Tillman Road but is now threatened by development at that site.

•Bethany and Schultz Halls at the old Fort Wayne Bible College on Rudisill Boulevard that are vacant and their future uncertain.

•The S.F. Bowser administration building on Creighton Avenue, once the headquarters of a gas pump maker, now threatened after the Fort Wayne Police Department moved out.

•Statues and tree canopies, including a statue at Memorial Park dedicated to Olen J. Pond and WWI veterans. The statue is headless and in need of repair.

•Foster Park Pavilion No. 3, built in the 1930s, is unused and vandalized.

•Joseph and Elnora Bash Hughes house, 1122 W. Wayne St., built in 1877, was damaged by fire last year and is vacant.

•The downtown blocks bordered by Webster, West Wayne, West Berry and South Harrison streets, and the block bordered by Ewing Street, Fairfield Avenue, Brackenridge Street and Jefferson Boulevard, which are targeted for redevelopment and face demolition.

•Franklin School on St. Marys Ave., Hillcrest School on Tillman Road, and Elmhurst High School, all threatened by vacancy and facing uncertainty and possible demolition.

•The old IOOF Hall, 402 E. Jefferson Blvd., more recently occupied by a church, damaged by fire and now vacant. But the building has recently changed hands.

•C.F. Bleke farmhouse, 13212 N. Lima Rd., built in 1875, occupied but in need of repairs.

•Hanselmann House, the first residential commission of architect Michael Graves and his only remaining Indiana residence, a modern residential house that is vacant. Another Graves commission in Allen County was destroyed by possible arson in 2002.

fgray@jg.net

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