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Associated Press

Think about how you eat for holidays

With Thanksgiving practically here, the holiday season is off and running. With it comes all the goodies that we so desire and that we so fear will make us overindulge.

But with a little planning, the food conflicts that can drain the joy from the holidays can be a thing of the past.

Out of sight, out of mind. The more visible food is (like the candy dish on the coffee table or your co-worker’s desk), the more likely we are to eat it. The trick is to make tempting goodies less visible. Using covered, opaque dishes for candy, and open dishes to display fresh fruit, will encourage the healthier choice.

Size matters. The bigger the package, container or plate you’re eating from, the more you’re likely to eat. The brain seems to be looking for signals to mark the end of eating. Something about seeing an empty plate, bowl or bag helps us feel satisfied whether the container is large or small. That’s why using smaller plates is so effective.

Serve and step away. During party situations, whenever possible, serve yourself reasonable portions and then step far away from the rest of the food. The less you look at food, the more likely you will be to feel satisfied with what you served yourself.

Slow down. It’s takes about 20 minutes for your brain to receive all the physiological signals that you’ve eaten enough. So the faster you eat, the more you’ll eat.

– Lavinia Rodriguez, Tampa Bay Times

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