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Movie Review: Refreshingly unique parable

'Prince Avalanche'

David Gordon Green has returned to his roots with "Prince Avalanche," a low-fi, weird and wonderful two-hander featuring Paul Rudd and Emile Hirsch. Loosely based on a 2011 Icelandic film called "Either Way," Green's "Prince Avalanche" often sounds as if it's been translated from a foreign language, in the best sense. With its surreal backdrop of a burned-out forest, its balance of drama and comedy (with a touch of the supernatural) and protagonists worthy of a Samuel Beckett play, "Prince Avalanche" is that refreshing movie that looks and sounds only like itself.

Rudd and Hirsch play Alvin and Lance, who in 1988 are painting yellow lines down a Texas highway after a series of forest fires have ravaged the nearby land and homes. Making their awkward way down the blacktop in a ramshackle truck and following strict rules on the use of a boombox, these two misfits continually bicker and misunderstand one another, usually making peace by the time they share their canvas tent come nightfall.

Although Alvin and Lance's encounters are frequently amusing – Alvin, a mustached know-it-all who fancies himself a deep thinker and outdoorsman, is continually looking disapprovingly through his aviators at the shaggy, shambling Lance, a would-be Lothario in his late 20s – "Prince Avalanche" comes most vividly to life when the two men are revealing their inner selves through pure action.

The net effect is funny, sad and psychedelic all at once, and as Green subtly pulls the lens back, "Prince Avalanche" becomes less a quirky buddy comedy than a winsome parable about people putting their lives back together, moment by stumbling moment.

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