You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.
Advertisement
Lara Neel - The Journal Gazette
Arrr, my mateys.

Getting Twisted

Lara Neel - The Journal Gazette
It looks very space age.
Lara Neel - The Journal Gazette
I'm really happy with how this scarf looks.
Lara Neel - The Journal Gazette
It's easy to use, if you can reliably count to 4.
Lara Neel - The Journal Gazette
I like it.

As a knitter, I was never really excited about fringe. It just seemed like an extra step to mess with before moving onto the next project.

In weaving, fringe is basically a by-product of having a warp, unless you plan to tuck in ends and hem things. Ask the sheet with the tiny tear that has been in the back of a closet for four years how often I pull out my sewing machine.

After I wrote about maybe, someday getting a fringe twister all of my online weaving friends said, "DO IT." I am a wimp for peer pressure, so I got one.

The one I ordered is made by Conair and looks like something from the Jetson's set.

If your friends and coworkers don't already think you're a little strange, bring this thing to work. It makes a whirring sound that reminded one of my friends of a dental hygienist's tools.

Overall, it was easy to use and I'm happy with the result. The yarn is connected to the spinners with little tiny hooks and they don't snag the yarn.

I need to pay closer attention next time, though. Once, I managed to create a group of five yarn ends among my groups of four, which meant, at the end, I had a group of three.

It's like the first time I worked feather-and-fan stitch. I felt like I was proving, over and over, that I can't really count to three in a reliable manner.

Advertisement