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'Mockingbird' author settles suit

NEW YORK — Harper Lee, the author of the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird," has settled a New York lawsuit against two of the defendants she sued in May to re-secure the copyright to her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel.

A court filing Friday in federal court in Manhattan said Lee's lawsuit against Leigh Ann Winick and Gerald Posner has been dismissed. Their lawyer said a settlement with the remaining defendants was likely to be reached week.

Attorney Vincent Carissimi wouldn't disclose the terms of the settlement. A lawyer for Lee did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

The 87-year-old author sued her former literary agent's son-in-law, Samuel Pinkus; companies he allegedly created; and alleged associates of his. She argued they had failed to protect the book's copyright.

"To Kill a Mockingbird" is a coming-of-age novel that explores racial tensions in the South before World War II. It won the Pulitizer Prize in 1961 and has been required reading in middle and high schools across the nation.

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