You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Editorial columns

  • Even great powers cowed by deaths of innocents
    Modern low-intensity conflicts are won and lost on their ragged edges. Nations act as though the careful plans of their militaries and intelligence operations can harness the chaos of combat and guide it to advance their interests.
  • Merkel the model for female leadership
    Would women be better than men at running the world? There’s a case to be made on the example of Angela Merkel, currently the longest-serving – and most popular – leader of a Group of Seven country.
  • Making your marketing, socially
    When the Fort Wayne TinCaps printed the names of their then-6,000 Twitter followers on a special jersey in 2013, they got national praise. ESPN’s official Twitter account said:
Advertisement

Maybe we can go home again

A well-received bestseller published in 1992 bears the title “Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus.” It turns out that men really may be from Mars, but so are women.

The idea is that about 4 billion years ago asteroids hit Mars, which then had a more hospitable climate. Meteorites sent chunks of matter into space, some of which landed on Earth.

Some of the meteorites may have transported key minerals, theorizes Steven Benner, a professor at the Westeheimer Institute of Science and Technology in Gainesville, Fla. Benner’s theory suggests how ribonucleic acid, a compound with ingredients vital to living organisms, might have come to Earth.

Somehow this stew of interplanetary ingredients evolved into living organisms, and these organisms evolved into humans. Mars was not quite so lucky.

But mankind, now that it has the capacity for interplanetary travel, is driven to go to Mars. Even now, two U.S. rovers are trundling around its surface. High overhead, an American satellite is making a detailed map of Mars’ surface. Can a GPS for Mars be far behind?

The space program is at a crossroads right now with a choice of missions: Return to the moon? Set up camp on one of the larger asteroids? Capture one of the smaller asteroids for further study?

But the space conversation keeps returning to putting astronauts, perhaps even a colony, on Mars. There are sound scientific reasons, but there is something deeper, less amenable to easy explanation.

Perhaps, at some primal level, we simply want to revisit the old neighborhood.

Advertisement