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World

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Associated Press
This rare 16th-century scientific artifact went missing from a Swedish museum a decade ago.

Missing early astronomy tool found

– A rare 16th-century scientific instrument used by early astronomers that has been missing from a Swedish museum for around a decade has been recovered and will be returned this week, the London-based Art Loss Register says.

The brass-and-silver astrolabe, made in 1590 and worth around $750,000, turned up when an Italian collector discovered that the piece was listed as missing and came forward to return it, Register Director Chris Marinello said.

Known since ancient times, astrolabes use stars for a variety of measurements. They can be used among other things to tell what time it is; to determine when sunrise and sunset will be; to determine latitude; and to quickly locate celestial bodies in the sky.

– Associated Press

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