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Figure in probe recounts offer

– A former associate of Biogenesis head Tony Bosch said he turned down a $125,000 offer from Major League Baseball for documents said to implicate players in the use of performance-enhancing drugs.

In an interview broadcast Thursday on ESPN’s “Outside the Lines,” Porter Fischer also said an additional dozen athletes from different sports – whose names have not been made public – were involved in the now-closed Florida anti-aging clinic.

Fischer, 49, admitted giving documents to the Miami News Times, which published a story in January detailing the alleged purchase of performance-enhancing drugs by Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez, 2012 All-Star game MVP Melky Cabrera, 2005 AL Cy Young Award winner Bartolo Colon and 2011 AL Championship Series MVP Nelson Cruz.

Others were later implicated in media reports, including Milwaukee outfielder Ryan Braun, who agreed this week to a 65-game suspension. Baseball’s investigation is ongoing.

Fischer said he received $5,500 in cash from MLB’s investigation. The network reported he rejected the larger sum because it wasn’t enough to restart his life.

“Once I turned them down for the $125,000, two days later they wrote me a letter instructing me not to destroy any documents and to keep them around,” he said. “Then two days after that on the 24th of March, I was transporting evidence back to the state investigator for him to follow up on some criminal activity, and my car was broken into and four boxes of evidence were taken.”

Fisher said when he first started working with Bosch, he thought Bosch was a doctor. Bosch’s failure to pay him money he was owed caused him to give documents to the New Times. At the time, he decided against contacting police or prosecutors.

“I didn’t feel comfortable going to local law enforcement,” he said.

Fischer claimed he received death threats from someone wanting to stop the article from being published.

In a story on ESPN.com, Fischer said some athletes had been purchasing from Bosch since 2009 and that some of the athletes were from the NBA, NCAA, boxing, tennis and MMA.

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