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Associated Press
Suci, a female Sumatran rhino, will be bred with her brother at the Cincinnati Zoo in Cincinnati.

Rhino siblings to be bred

Ohio zoo hopes for offspring as species declines

– With the survival of a species on the line, Cincinnati Zoo scientists are hoping to mate their lone female Sumatran rhino with her little brother.

The desperation breeding effort with the rhino siblings follows a recent crisis summit in Singapore where conservationists concluded as few as 100 of the two-horned, hairy rhinos might remain in their native southeast Asia. The species’ numbers have fallen by up to 90 percent since the mid-1980s as development takes away habitat space and poachers hunt them for their prized horns.

Rhinos overall are dwindling globally, and the Sumatran species descended from Ice Age woolly rhinos is one of the most critically endangered.

The Cincinnati Zoo has been a pioneer in captive breeding of the rhino species, producing the first three born in captivity. Its conservationists this month brought back the youngest, 6-year-old Harapan, from the Los Angeles Zoo and soon will try to have him mate with the zoo’s female – his biological sister – 8-year-old Suci.

“We absolutely need more calves for the population as a whole; we have to produce as many as we can as quickly as we can,” said Terri Roth, who heads the zoo’s Center for Research of Endangered Wildlife. “The population is in sharp decline and there’s a lot of urgency around getting her pregnant.”

Critics of captive breeding programs say they often do more harm than good and can create animals less likely to survive in the wild. Inbreeding increases the possibility of bad genetic combinations for offspring.

“When your species is almost gone, you just need animals and that matters more than genes right now – these are two of the youngest, healthiest animals in the population,” Roth said.

Mating between such close rhino relatives might happen in the wild, Roth said. If the offspring of such a mating then bred with an unrelated rhino, the genetic diversity would resume in the next generation, she said.

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