You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Movies

  • Sibling chemistry a natural fit
    LOS ANGELES – In the new big-screen adaption of the best-selling Jonathan Topper novel “This Is Where I Leave You,” Tina Fey and Jason Bateman portray siblings with tight ties that bind.
  • Sibling chemistry a natural fit
    LOS ANGELES – In the new big-screen adaption of the best-selling Jonathan Topper novel “This Is Where I Leave You,” Tina Fey and Jason Bateman portray siblings with tight ties that bind.
  • Plot fails in reality-bender
    'The Congress'1/2 Two half-realized visions of near-future horrors don't add up to much of a whole in “The Congress,” Ari Folman's mixture of live action and animation that follows his
Advertisement
In theaters
(PG, for some mild action and thematic elements; 1:35)
Coldwater Crossing: In 2-D: 12:25, 2:45, 5:05, 7:25 and 9:50 p.m. today and Thursday; In 3-D: 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 4:35, 6:55 and 9:15 p.m. today and Thursday
Northwood Cinema Grill: 12:30, 3:15 and 6:15 p.m. today and Thursday
Strand Theatre Kendallville: 7:15 p.m. today and Thursday
20th Century Fox
Ryan Reynolds provides the voice for the lead character, a racing snail, in “Turbo.”
movie review

Unfunny racing-snail story goes nowhere fast

‘Turbo’

In delivering a film about a garden snail that dreams of winning the Indy 500, it’s as if the makers of “Turbo” had been pressed to come up with the most extreme underdog tale they could think of. Or else animators really are running out of ideas for original new characters.

An attractively designed but narratively challenged, one-note film, “Turbo” skews younger than the norm for big animated features these days and has limited appeal for little girls.

“The sooner you accept the dull, miserable nature of your existence, the happier you’ll be,” worldly-wise snail Chet (Paul Giamatti) advises his younger brother Turbo (Ryan Reynolds) after yet another day scouring a garden tomato patch. Turbo spends all his downtime watching VHS tapes of professional car races, especially the many won by his hero, Guy Gagne (Bill Hader, amusingly assuming a French-Canadian accent).

Of course, the message of the film, as with so many other kid-inspirational cartoons and other fantasies, is that no dream is too big, you can do anything if you set your mind to it, etc., etc. Unfortunately, the real embedded lesson of Turbo is that, if you’re too small or weak or otherwise incapable of greatness, you have a shot to win if you’re juiced.

Which is what happens late one night when Turbo, coming upon a “Fast & Furious”-style drag race in a dry L.A. riverbed, gets sucked into an engine. Instead of being toasted, however, the little guy becomes infused with nitrous oxide, enabling him to zoom along the ground seemingly as fast as Superman shoots through the skies.

The ultimate destination – Indianapolis – is inevitable, but it takes a long time to get there, given a script that is short on invention and long on largely unfunny yacking.

Advertisement