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Business

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Business reserves increase slightly

– U.S. businesses increased their stockpiles only slightly in May, despite a solid sales increase.

The figures suggest economic growth has slowed but could pick up in the second half of the year.

The Commerce Department said Monday that business stockpiles rose just 0.1 percent in May from April, half the previous month’s increase.

Sales increased 1.1 percent in May after being flat in April. That’s the best gain since February.

Slower restocking could weigh on economic growth in the April-June quarter because it means companies ordered fewer factory goods. But the strong sales gain suggests companies may have to order more goods in the coming months to keep up with demand. That could drive more economic growth in the second half of the year.

Many analysts think economic growth has slowed to an annual rate of around 1 percent or even less in the April-June quarter. That was lower than the subpar 1.8 percent annual rate from January through March.

Economists expect growth should rebound in the second half of the year to a roughly 2.5 percent annual rate as the effects of federal tax hikes and government spending cuts fade.

The brighter second half outlook is bolstered by steady job growth, which has kept consumers spending. Employers have added 202,000 jobs a month through the first six months of this year. That’s up from 180,000 in the previous six months.

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