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File | Associated Press
This Feb. 25, 1967, photo shows self-confessed Boston Strangler Albert DeSalvo minutes after his capture in Boston. DeSalvo confessed to the string of 1960s killings but was never convicted.

Prosecutor: DNA links suspect to Boston Strangler victim

File | Associated Press
In this March 10, 2000, photo, Diane Dodd, left, and son Casey Sherman hold a photo of Dodd's sister Mary Sullivan, who was found strangled in January 1964 and is believed to have been the last victim of the Boston Strangler. Patriot Ledge | Greg Derr

BOSTON – A Massachusetts prosecutor says advances in DNA technology have allowed investigators to link longtime suspect Albert DeSalvo to the last of the 1960s slayings attributed to the Boston Strangler.

Suffolk District Attorney Daniel Conley says the DNA produced a "familial match" with DeSalvo. His remains are being exhumed and Conley says he expects an exact match.

Nineteen-year-old Mary Sullivan was found strangled in her Boston apartment in January 1964. She was the last of 11 women whose deaths were attributed to the Boston Strangler and the only victim for which DNA evidence is available.

DeSalvo confessed to the killings but was never convicted. He died in 1973.

Sullivan's nephew Casey Sherman has for years maintained that DeSalvo didn't kill his aunt. But he says he accepts the findings and says the DNA evidence appears overwhelming.

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