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Letters

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      Weigh all the implicationsof overhauling tax code Several lawmakers have proposed reforms that broaden the tax base and lower tax rates by removing a
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     Weigh all the implicationsof overhauling tax codeSeveral lawmakers have proposed reforms that broaden the tax base and lower tax rates by removing a combination of incentives or provisions.
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    Maintain Legacy Fund for transformative projects It is my belief that the request for $2.
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Letters

Lead by example to set ethical path

In my 12 years with the BBB Serving Northern Indiana, I have observed businesses, charities and individual consumers committing unethical acts. To some degree, all of us have made unethical choices.

The Ethics Resource Center notes that most unethical behavior is the result of basically honest people who have been corrupted by expediency and social conditioning. Pressures of the marketplace, productivity and life itself make it necessary to cut corners. The ends justify the means. Many people have suggested solutions. I would offer two things that each of us could do: education and rewarding those who do it right. All of us are teachers; personal examples can be much more powerful than sermons or seminars. As business leaders, educators, parents and grandparents, we can have a huge effect on society if we take the time to tell young people why ethical behavior is important.

Reward businesses and charities that demonstrate ethical behavior. There are a number of places to help you evaluate these organizations: BBB, Angie’s List, Yelp and other consumer review websites.

I believe that a vast majority of people in northern Indiana strive to do the right things. Ethics and integrity are alive and well.

Ethics is, after all, a very personal matter. It is easy to point out the failings of others. What we can hope for is that a great majority of people in northern Indiana will make it their mission to demonstrate what it means to do it right.

MICHAEL D. COIL Retired President BBB serving Northern Indiana

Texas abortion filibuster attack on Christian values

Last week Wendy Davis, a Democrat from Fort Worth, Texas, filibustered in the Texas legislature to defeat a bill that would not have allowed an abortion past 20 weeks (yes, five months) of a pregnancy in Texas. She was called a hero by her party, having received a phone call from the president and being hailed as a future star of her party. Is this what our country has come to – a hero and a future star for this accomplishment? Our Christian values are not just being attacked, but they are being destroyed by this administration.

JIM GREGORY Fort Wayne

Untested form unjustly glorified in print

A link to Stacey Stumpf’s column on the POST (“Handling with care,” June 23) is now on polst.org , which is why I read it. Unfortunately, like most such newspaper pieces, it is positive with no discussion of the negative aspects of physician orders for life-sustaining treatment. The uncritical media coverage has, in my opinion, resulted in a rush to embrace the POLST by legislators and medical institutions, including those in Indiana.

The POLST lacks sufficient research to justify the positive reception it has had. Although there are more than 20 studies on the form, virtually all are designed to show that doctors will comply with what is written. There is no research showing that what is written reflects authentic, informed and stable patient treatment preferences.

I maintain a non-faith-based blog on the POLST which explores issues regarding the form. Recently, the organization Not Dead Yet, a disability rights group, put out a statement on its website that was picked up by Huffington Post and others. E. Christian Brugger approaches the issue from a Catholic perspective.

Should you have an opportunity to address the form again, I hope you will take a balanced approach.

JASON W. MANNE Pittsburgh

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