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Business

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    John D. Zeglis is brimming with words of business wisdom.And the retired chairman and CEO of AT&T Wireless Services is eager to share them with the next generation of business leaders.
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    U.S. mortgage lending is contracting to levels not seen since 1997 as rising interest rates and home prices drive away borrowers. Wells Fargo & Co. and JPMorgan Chase & Co., the two largest U.S.
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briefs

Shambaugh to break ground

Shambaugh & Son will have a groundbreaking ceremony Wednesday to celebrate a $4.3 million expansion that will add 110 jobs over the next 1½ years.

Officials announced the development last week.

The company specializes in new and retrofit construction for industrial, commercial, institutional, food processing, medical and biofuel projects. A two-part expansion will include an 8,000-square-foot addition at its Fort Wayne headquarters, 7614 Opportunity Drive, bringing the location to 140,000 square feet.

SunCoke agrees to pay $2 million over pollution

SunCoke Energy and two subsidiaries will pay a $2 million fine to resolve alleged air pollution violations at plants in Illinois and Ohio.

The agreement between SunCoke Energy and the U.S. Justice Department was announced Wednesday. It requires the companies to spend $100 million to upgrade pollution control equipment. The alleged violations occurred at Gateway Energy and Coke plant in Granite City, Ill., and the Haverhill Coke plant in Franklin Furnace, Ohio.

The companies also agreed to spend $255,000 to help remove lead paint hazards from low-income homes in southern Illinois.

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