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Inbee Park, the world’s No. 1 player, tees off on the second hole during the second round of the U.S. Women’s Open on Friday. She has a two-stroke lead.
Golf

World’s top player takes 2-shot lead at US Open

– Inbee Park couldn’t see her final tee shot past about 150 yards.

Nothing fazes the world’s top-ranked player these days, though. Fog had rolled in off Great Peconic Bay, and the horn sounded with Park’s group on the 18th fairway. The threesome finished out the second round of the U.S. Women’s Open, with Park calmly sinking a birdie putt from 12 feet to move closer to history.

She shot a 4-under 68 on Friday for a 9-under total to lead fellow South Korean I.K. Kim by two strokes. Park is seeking to win the year’s first three major championships; no one has accomplished that feat in a season with at least four majors.

Of the players yet to finish the round, the closest, England’s Jodi Ewart Shadoff, was five strokes back with three holes to go.

Ha-Neul Kim, the first-round leader, had a 77 to fall to 1 under.

Players were surprised Thursday to arrive at Sebonack to find the tees moved up and the weather calm – an easy course by U.S. Women’s Open standards. On Friday, the setup and the conditions were more what they expected: The wind picked up and some pins were tucked into uncomfortable spots.

Then the mist settled in late in the afternoon session.

“With the wind and fog, it really made me think that’s what the U.S. Open is all about,” Park said.

Of the other players to complete the round, Lizette Salas was third at 4 under after a 72. Fellow Americans Angela Stanford and Jessica Korda were another stroke back. Stanford had a 68, and Korda shot 71.

I.K. Kim shot a 69 in the morning session.

PGA: In Bethesda, Md., Jordan Spieth hit every green in regulation and extended his streak to 29 holes without a bogey on a tough Congressional course, giving him a 5-under 66 and a share of the lead with Roberto Castro (69) before storms halted the second round of the AT&T National. They were at 7-under 135, with the round to be completed today.

Players went back out to the practice range after a two-hour delay, only for more storms to approach and extended the suspension until the PGA Tour called it for the day. Andres Romero was at 5 under with five holes remaining. No one else was within four shots of the lead.

CHAMPIONS: In Pittsburgh, Fred Couples roared through his first 11 holes in the second round of the Senior Players Championship, ripping off seven birdies at water-logged Fox Chapel to take the lead at 11 under.

Then the weather managed to do what the defenseless course could not, stopping the Hall of Famer with a sudden downpour that suspended play for the day with most of the field still on the course.

First-round leader John Huston was two shots back at 9 under.

EUROPEAN: In Maynooth, Ireland, American Peter Uihlein and England’s Robert Rock shared the second-round lead in the Irish Open, while Rory McIlroy missed the cut in his final tournament before the British Open.

Uihlein had a 4-under 68 to match Rock (66) at 9-under 135 at Carton House.

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