You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

In the service

  • Fogle, Ashley M.
    Air National Guard Airman 1st Class Ashley M. Fogle has been assigned to the 180th Fighter Wing, Ohio Air National Guard, as a Reserve Component member.
  • Shutt, Austin M.
    Navy Seaman Apprentice Austin M. Shutt recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill.
  • Terry escorts ammunition
Advertisement

Lying about medals could mean prison time

WASHINGTON – Lying about receiving a military medal could become a crime, under a bill headed to the president’s desk.

The Stolen Valor Act cleared the Senate on Wednesday and the House earlier this week. The act makes it a crime to lie about military medals, if the purpose is to benefit from the claim.

The measure revives a law struck down by the Supreme Court. The court said it may be disreputable to lie about receiving a medal, but it’s protected under the First Amendment.

This bill is narrower, making it a crime to lie about being decorated with the intent to profit personally or financially. It’s sponsored by Nevada Republicans Joe Heck in the House and Dean Heller in the Senate. Violators could face up to a year in prison.

Advertisement