You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Economy

Advertisement
Associated Press
Sam and Liz Weidner view a home for sale in Lowell, Mich. Sales of previously occupied homes are at a 3½-year high.

Home sales keep brisk pace

Housing costs and inventory spur gains in real estate market

– Sales of previously occupied U.S. homes ticked up last month to the highest level in 3 1/2 years, helped by a jump in the number of houses for sale.

The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that sales rose to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.97 million, up from 4.94 million in March.

Home sales have risen 9.7 percent in the past 12 months, evidence that the housing market is still improving.

But sales have been roughly flat since November. The supply of available homes remains tight, and many potential buyers aren’t able to get loans.

The number of homes for sale rose 12 percent in April from March to 2.16 million. But inventory is still almost 14 percent lower than a year earlier.

The increase in inventories partly reflects the beginning of the spring selling season. The supply of homes would be exhausted in 5.2 months at the current sales pace. That’s below the typical level of about six months.

More Americans are interested in purchasing homes: Buyer traffic has risen 31 percent in the past year, the Realtors’ group said.

Rising demand and tight supply has pushed up prices. The median price of a home for sale jumped 11 percent last month from April 2012 to $192,800. That’s the highest in nearly five years. The median is the figure halfway between the highest and lowest number.

Higher prices could encourage more people to sell homes, fueling further sales gains.

“Sellers want to sell in a rising market,” said Jonathan Basile, an economist at Credit Suisse. “When more sellers come out and sell, they’ll also have to buy.”

Advertisement