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Furthermore …

Bimrose
Land

IU sets record straight on blog inaccuracies

A blogger’s inaccurate claim that Indiana University was eliminating full-time hourly employees to circumvent the federal health care law prompted IU officials to refute it soundly.

Blogger Dan Bimrose wrote in April that hourly workers, “with or without retirement,” would be limited to 29 hours a week to avoid the Affordable Care Act requirement to offer health insurance to employees who work at least 30 hours a week. The Huffington Post published Bimrose’s post last week, including his assertion that “we must accept that Indiana University is also an employer only willing to provide to their employees just that which they can get away with.”

Not true, writes Mark Land, associate vice president for university communications, in a response posted at the popular blog site two days later.

“Full-time employees who are paid by the hour – of which there are more than 6,000 at Indiana University – already are entitled to medical benefits and will continue to receive them,” Land writes. “In fact, IU will insure more of these employees next fiscal year due to the change in the definition of full-time employment.”

Bimrose’s error comes from confusing full-time hourly workers with part-time hourly workers. As is the case with school districts and universities around the country, steps are being taken to limit weekly hours to 29. Employees in the latter group, which at IU includes temporary, seasonal and work-study employees, don’t currently qualify for medical insurance.

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