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  • Nobel laureate, ‘Cholera’ author dies at 87
    Gabriel Garcia Marquez, the Nobel laureate whose intoxicating novels and short stories exposed millions outside Latin America to its passions, superstition, violence and social inequality, died at home in Mexico City on Thursday.
  • 2 bodies found, 2 missing on Lake Erie
    The bodies of two of four missing boaters were recovered in western Lake Erie on Thursday, a day after the group left for an afternoon of fishing and sent pictures to relatives.
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Associated Press
The Solar Impulse plane sits on the tarmac in Mountain View, Calif., early Friday before taking off on a day-and-night cross-country trip.
Briefs

Gunshots, blunt trauma killed Tsarnaev

– A suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings died from gunshot wounds and blunt trauma to his head and torso, a funeral director said Friday.

Worcester funeral home owner Peter Stefan has 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s body and read details from his death certificate. The certificate cites Tsarnaev’s “gunshot wounds of torso and extremities” and lists the time of death as 1:35 a.m. April 19, four days after the deadly bombing, Stefan said.

Tsarnaev died after a gunfight with authorities who had launched a massive manhunt for him and his brother, ethnic Chechens from Russia who came to the United States about a decade ago. Police have said he ran out of ammunition before his younger brother dragged his body under a vehicle while fleeing.

Tsarnaev’s family on Friday was making arrangements for his funeral as investigators searched the woods near a college attended by 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was captured less than a day after his brother’s death.

Boyfriend murder trial goes to jurors

Jurors began deliberations in Jodi Arias’ murder trial Friday after four months of testimony and closing arguments from both sides that presented far different scenarios of the killing and motivation, leaving the panel to come to grips with the dearth of evidence and Arias’ ever-changing version of events.

Closing arguments wrapped up with Arias’ lawyer imploring jurors to take an impartial view of his client, even if they don’t like her, and prosecutors describing the defendant as a manipulative liar who meticulously planned the attack and is still lying.

Thieves often hit Texas fertilizer plant

Burglars occasionally sneaked into and around a Texas fertilizer plant in the years before a massive, deadly explosion – sometimes looking for a chemical fertilizer stored at the plant that can be used to make methamphetamine, according to local sheriff’s records.

Sheriff’s deputies were called more than 10 times to West Fertilizer in the 11 years before an April 17 blast that killed 14 people, injured 200 and leveled part of the tiny town of West, according to McLennan County sheriff’s office files released through an open-records request.

The records portray a plant with no outer fence that was a sporadic target of intruders. Law enforcement was occasionally called because someone had noticed the smell of gas outside or signs of an intruder.

California wildfire triples in size

A Southern California wildfire burning through coastal wilderness nearly tripled in size Friday, growing to more than 43 square miles.

Fifteen structures in the area 50 miles northwest of Los Angeles sustained some damage, and other homes in a wooded area were being threatened. About 900 firefighters using engines, aircraft, bulldozers and other equipment had it just 20 percent contained.

Hikers may have to pay for rescue

Two teen hikers lost for days in a California forest might have to pay for part or all of the $160,000 search after a small amount of drugs was found in their car, authorities said.

Officials initially said Nicolas Cendoya, 19, and Kyndall Jack, 18, wouldn’t be responsible. But Cendoya was charged this week with drug possession because methamphetamine was allegedly found in the car the pair parked before going on a hike last month in Cleveland National Forest.

Solar plane begins all-hours voyage

A solar-powered airplane left Northern California on Friday for the first leg of a planned cross-country trip that its co-pilot described as a “milestone” in aviation history.

The creators of the Solar Impulse – considered the world’s most advanced sun-powered plane – said the trip is the first attempt by a solar airplane capable of flying day and night without fuel to fly across America.

It plans to land in Phoenix, Dallas, St. Louis, Washington and New York. Each flight leg will take about 19 to 25 hours, with 10-day stops in each city.

Man bites dog to free injured wife

An Iowa woman whose nose was severely injured by an attacking dog says her husband bit the animal to make it stop assaulting her.

Caren and Laine Henry told the Des Moines Register that a 50-pound Labrador mix ran out of a yard in rural Madrid on Sunday and attacked the couple while they were walking their pet beagle. She says her husband was bit on an arm when he tried to help her.

Caren Henry says her husband “finally had to bite the dog in its nose, and it let loose.”

Taping students’ mouths no crime

Police say no crime occurred when a second-grade Colorado teacher taped her students’ mouth shut when they wouldn’t be quiet.

Police interviewed the teacher at Fulton Academy in the suburb of Aurora after a student told her mother who then reported Thursday’s incident to police. The student confirmed to police the teacher’s statement to an officer that it was a joke, the children were laughing, and had asked that their mouths be taped.

In her statement to police, the teacher said she didn’t “think anything bad” about placing a small, vertical strip of transparent tape on all 28 students’ mouths.

The unidentified teacher is on paid administrative leave while the Aurora Public Schools district investigates.

Exercise cuts risk of kidney stones

Women have another reason to exercise: It may help prevent kidney stones. You don’t have to break a sweat or be a super athlete, either. Even walking for a couple hours a week can cut the risk of developing this painful and common problem by about one-third, a large study found.

“Every little bit makes a difference” and the intensity doesn’t matter – just getting a minimum amount of exercise does, said Dr. Mathew Sorensen of the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, who led the study.

Goldfish found deep inside nuclear plant

Operators of a nuclear reactor near Cleveland are reviewing security cameras and log books to find out who left a pair of goldfish in an underground steam tunnel at the plant.

The goldfish found swimming in a juice pitcher placed inside the secure area didn’t pose a safety concern, but the episode is an embarrassment for the plant already under increased scrutiny for its worker training and procedures.

It’s almost certain that an employee or contractor smuggled them into the Perry nuclear power plant alongside Lake Erie, said Jennifer Young, a spokeswoman for FirstEnergy Corp.

Raise comes with company tattoo

Getting tattooed with the company logo is all the rage at one New York City brokerage firm. The reward? A 15 percent pay raise.

About 40 employees of Rapid Realty NYC have gotten inked with the logo in the past two years, CEO Anthony Lolli says. Lolli says workers are “passionate about the brand.”

Lolli started the policy a year and a half ago after one employee got the tattoo to prove his company loyalty.

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