You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Letters

  • Letters
     Income inequality slowingour land of opportunityWe have heard a lot recently about the income and wealth gap. Why should we be concerned?
  • Letters
      Weigh all the implicationsof overhauling tax code Several lawmakers have proposed reforms that broaden the tax base and lower tax rates by removing a
  • Letters
     Weigh all the implicationsof overhauling tax codeSeveral lawmakers have proposed reforms that broaden the tax base and lower tax rates by removing a combination of incentives or provisions.
Advertisement

Letters

Failing charter schools should repay loans

I saw a small article that reported that eight charter schools’ loans may be forgiven. The article went on to say Indiana lawmakers were considering forgiving $12 million dollars in loans that failing charter schools accepted from the state.

Are you kidding me? Those would be taxpayer dollars, I assume. It appears this money has been rolled over into the roughly $80 million the Senate has budgeted to repay school loans taken out by charter schools.

What in the world is going on with these charter schools and Ball State and the charter school boards, who are supposedly overseeing these schools? What in the world is going on with our legislators, who are considering forgiving the loans that taxpayers invested in these schools?

I believe Ball State and the individual charter school boards need to be on the hook for those dollars – and perhaps the legislators who passed charter school legislation – not the taxpayers of Indiana, who have no say in their oversight.

Who is responsible when these schools fail?

VICKY FOLTZ Fort Wayne

Guns can help cure overpopulation problem

We have the cure for overpopulation and don’t even acknowledge it. Get more guns out there. We could even build them here in Indiana.

CLARENCE KRUGER Fort Wayne

Gun control loss reminds Obama who’s in charge

I do not see the need for assault weapons or machine guns in the hands of anyone. However, we learned knives kill, bombs kill. How to outlaw people bound and determined to do evil acts? We cannot.

A mother drowns her children in a bathtub. Another mother drives her car into a river and watches her children die. Another mother leaves her young daughter with a neighbor – and upon her return finds her daughter murdered. She was not shot; she was butchered and stuck in a garbage can with parts in a freezer.

Why do we allow these crimes? I do not know.

I do know that from the beginning of time there have been murders and wars. I have said many times, we do not need guns to kill. Should we have knife, hatchet, saw control? How about poisons?

Sorry about your slap in the face, President Obama. Perhaps we were telling you that you are not in complete control like you thought you were – right or wrong.

MARYANNE CORDES Fort Wayne

Raising driving age would reduce accidents

The legal age to get a driver’s license should be raised to 18 because teens can be easily distracted. Crash rates have increased over the last few years because distractions have increased as well.

There are numerous distractions while teenagers are driving. A high percentage of teen car accidents are caused by intoxicated drivers. Also, talking on a cellphone decreases reaction time to that of a 70-year-old. Even driving with passengers in the vehicle can reduce reaction time and increase the risk of teen car crashes.

Over the years crash rates have increased. Thirty-three percent of teen car crashes in 2010 were caused by 16- to 19-year-olds. Sixteen-year-olds have the highest crash rates, an additional reason for the driving age to be raised.

There are a variety of ways to prevent all these car accidents. Teens need to closely watch the speed limit because every mile per hour teens go over the speed limit, the prospect of getting into an accident increases. Also, teens do not always wear their seatbelts; however, if their parents are involved, then they are more likely to wear them. In addition, I believe that if their supervised driving period is extended, they will be better drivers when they are alone.

Currently the legal driving age is 16, and I strongly feel that it should be raised. Should 16-year-olds really be able to drive?

CORINNE REBBER New Haven Grade 7

Advertisement