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Clinton to get skinnier downtown with sidewalk project

FORT WAYNE – The streetscape project along Clinton Street between Main and Berry streets got its official start Wednesday as the mayor and local building owners praised the work.

Crews started Monday work to remove the easternmost lane of Clinton Street; in its place will be a new, wider sidewalk marked by large planters and decorative lighting.

The work will vastly improve the streetscape in front of the Anthony Wayne Building at Clinton and Berry and The Journal Gazette Building at Clinton and Main, but will also wrap around the buildings onto Main and Berry and improve the alley that runs from Barr Street to Clinton, officials said.

"This will be a new and dynamic addition to downtown Fort Wayne," Mayor Tom Henry said. "This will really make the entrance into our city much more attractive than it is now."

The $265,839 project, approved by the city's Redevelopment Commission, is being paid for by the Tax Increment Financing district that covers the area. Within that district, the increase in property taxes collected – caused by projects such as the renovation of the Anthony Wayne Building – can be used for infrastructure projects.

For more on this story see Thursday's print edition of The Journal Gazette or return to www.journalgazette.net after 3 a.m. Thursday.

dstockman@jg.net

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