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Kentucky Derby
Where: Churchill Downs, Louisville, Ky.
When: Saturday
Post time: 6:24 p.m.
TV: NBC
Associated Press
Trainer D. Wayne Lukas, right, walks with Derby entrant Oxbow and jockey Gary Stevens after a workout at Churchill Downs on Monday.

Elder statesmen still shoot for Derby win

– D. Wayne Lukas and Gary Stevens know what it’s like hearing the roar of the crowd and inhaling the intoxicating scent from dozens of red roses in the Kentucky Derby winner’s circle.

At their advanced ages, they want to feel it all again.

On Saturday, they’ll make another run at winning America’s greatest race, and if experience counts, this duo might have an edge.

Lukas and Stevens are teaming with Oxbow, while the trainer considered the sport’s elder statesman also will saddle Will Take Charge. The colts will be Lukas’ 46th and 47th Derby starters, the most of any trainer in the race’s 138-year history. He has won it four times, but not since 1999.

“I don’t feel any different than when I came in here at 50. There’s still the adrenaline rush. There’s still the enthusiasm,” Lukas said. “The horse is the most important ingredient. You better have the horse and then some luck.”

Stevens has ridden in 18 Derbies and won three times, including twice with Lukas – 1988 aboard the filly Winning Colors and 1995 with Thunder Gulch. The 50-year-old jockey is four months into a comeback after being retired for seven years.

At 77, Lukas would be the oldest trainer to win the Derby.

“The karma is good between us,” Lukas said. “The experience factor for me is so big here. With 20-horse fields, having been there and won, it makes a huge difference for me. I’m going to be comfortable and not worry about it.”

Stevens considers Lukas to be a second father, while the trainer’s only son, Jeff, is like a brother.

“There’s definitely a mutual respect,” the jockey said. “We’re both highly motivated. We haven’t lost our need for big moments. Wayne is able to transmit that enthusiasm level to his whole team. I’ve been part of the team for a long time.”

Stevens resumed riding in early January, the same week he got a call from Lukas advising him that the trainer had a couple of promising 3-year-old colts who could make the Derby.

“I was kind of thinking, `Yeah right, wouldn’t that be great,’ and here we are,” said Stevens, who juggles his duties as a racing TV commentator with his riding commitments.

He had quit in 2005, driven out by unrelenting knee pain.

In retirement, he ballooned to 134 pounds – huge for a jockey. Once he decided to mount a comeback, he hired a personal trainer, a nutritionist and a sports psychologist. Now he’s down to 113 pounds, and is mentally relieved knowing that he doesn’t have to sweat off extra pounds. “I couldn’t feel better,” he said.

Retired Hall of Fame rider Pat Day bumped into Stevens outside Lukas’ barn at Churchill Downs and told him, “You’re looking good.”

Lukas thinks so, too.

“I’ve seen him with his shirt off,” he said. “The weight doesn’t seem to be a factor.”

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