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Obama cautious on punishing Syria

– Proceeding cautiously, President Obama insisted Friday that any use of chemical weapons by Syria would change his “calculus” about U.S. military involvement in the 2-year-old civil war – but said too little was known about a pair of likely sarin attacks to order aggressive action now.

The president’s public response to the latest intelligence reflected the lack of agreement in Washington over whether to use America’s military to intervene in the civil war – and if so, how. But lawmakers in both parties expressed concern that inaction could embolden Syrian President Bashar Assad and perhaps other countries including North Korea and Iran.

U.S. officials declared Thursday that the Syrian government probably had used chemical weapons twice in March, newly provocative acts in the civil war that has killed more than 70,000 people and displaced hundreds of thousands more. The U.S. assessment followed similar conclusions from Britain, France, Israel and Qatar – key allies eager for a more aggressive response to Syrian conflict. Obama, in his first comments about the new intelligence disclosure, said Friday, “For the Syrian government to utilize chemical weapons on its people crosses a line that will change my calculus and how the United States approaches these issues.”

He has issued similar warnings for months, saying the use of chemical weapons or transfer of the stockpiles to terrorists would cross a “red line” and carry “enormous consequences.”

Seeking to show resolve, Obama added that “I’ve meant what I said.”

The president is facing political pressure from a familiar contingent of senators, led by Arizona Republican John McCain, favoring a quick and strong U.S. response. But even those lawmakers appear opposed to an American military invasion and are instead supporting creation of a protective no-fly zone or another narrow, safe zone inside Syria, along its border with Turkey.

Some lawmakers voiced concern that if Obama doesn’t make good on his promise to respond aggressively if it’s shown that Assad used chemical weapons, his inaction could send a damaging message to the world.

“There’s no question that, when the United States takes a position that this crosses a line, that our failure to respond has implications,” said Rep. David Cicilline, a Democratic member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

“So that if we, in fact, determine that chemical weapons were used, I think the expectation is that we and the coalition and others take some action.”

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