You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Professional

  • Serena starts slow, rolls at Open
    Good as she is, even Serena Williams can find it tough to deal with swirling wind, so much so that she double-faulted three times in her first service game Thursday at the U.S. Open.
  • Williams overcomes 3 early double-faults to win
    NEW YORK – Good as she is, even Serena Williams can find it tough to deal with swirling wind, so much so that she double-faulted three times in her first service game Thursday at the U.S.
  • 2-time Horse of Year Wise Dan to return to races
    Two-time Horse of the Year Wise Dan is set to return to the races this weekend at Saratoga, 3 1/2 months after having emergency surgery.
Advertisement

NFL draft: Offense

Notable offensive players in the 2013 NFL draft, grouped by projected NFL positions:

Quarterback

Geno Smith, West Virginia: Mixed reviews on Smith, who possibly suffered because of 2012’s strong class … Solid build … Gets rid of ball quickly, but has had some accuracy problems … Questionable ability to read blitz … Can make completions on run … Capable of big plays.

Matt Barkley, USC: Comes off disappointing and injury-plagued final season at USC … Has played throughout his career with Trojans in pro-style offense … A leader … Inaccurate on deep balls and over middle at times … Tips off where he is throwing … Tough player and resilient.

E.J. Manuel, Florida State: Tall, athletic … Has overcome injury issues in college, played entire 2012 season … Pretty good arm, can make most throws accurately … Gambles too much, makes some ill-advised throws … Leaves pocket too quickly at times.

Mike Glennon, North Carolina State: At 6-foot-7, tallest QB in this group … Has arm strength teams want … Inconsistent and mistake prone for most of career … Doesn’t read coverages well.

Landry Jones, Oklahoma: Big disappointment as senior, but his previous performances with Sooners make him attractive … Best pure pocket passer of top QB prospects … Feels pressure and scrambles too soon … Makes mistakes throwing on run.

Running back

Eddie Lacy, Alabama: Follows Mark Ingram and Trent Richardson as productive Tide runner … Knows how to handle big games … Powerful, can run over tacklers … Might be only RB to go in first round.

Giovani Bernard, junior, North Carolina: Good balance of production in running game and passing game … Might play role as be kick returner.

Montee Ball, Wisconsin: Record-setting runner who uses his solid build at 5-10, 215 to spring free from behind mammoth blockers … Always had ball in his hands for Badgers … Holds NCAA mark for TDs, even tied single-season record with 39 in 2011.

Joseph Randle, junior, Oklahoma State: Versatile, can break a big gainer … Led Big 12 in rushing with 1,417 yards … Can play all three downs … Finds end zone.

Le’Veon Bell, junior, Michigan State: Big, durable back at 6-2, 227 … Never stops coming and wears down defenders … Won’t do a lot in passing game.

Wide receiver

Tavon Austin, West Virginia: Can break a long play every time he touches ball … Also will be dynamic returning kicks … Goes only 5-8, 175, but never takes a big hit … Won Paul Hornung Award as most versatile college player.

Keenan Allen, junior, California: Slow to recover from knee injury after once being rated top WR prospect … Runs precise routes, has good size at 6-2, 206 … Not a speed demon, but gets open and fights for ball.

Cordarrelle Patterson, junior, Tennessee: Also can make impact as kick returner … Scored touchdowns in four ways in 2012 … Runs pretty good routes and can get open deep … Does not have great hands.

DeAndre Hopkins, junior, Clemson: Spectacular at times, has excellent footwork … Scored 18 touchdowns in 2012 … Has no fear of going after ball in crowds … Nice size at 6-1, 215.

Robert Woods, junior, Southern California: Big-time player for Trojans for first two seasons, but slumped like rest of team last year … Elusive, knows how to avoid first hit … Can make awesome grabs, then drop easier ones.

Tight end

Tyler Eifert, TE, Notre Dame: The Irish have a strong history at position … The Bishop Dwenger graduate doesn’t drop ball … Much more a receiving tight end than blocker … Won Mackey Award as nation’s best TE.

Zach Ertz, junior, Stanford: Top prospect from school that produces tight ends .… Had most receiving yards of any TE in country … Solid at 6-5, 250 … Difficult to bring down when he latches on to ball.

Tackles

Luke Joeckel, junior, Texas A&M: Rated as top prospect for all positions by several analysts … Strong, aggressive, but also mobile … Solid fundamentals … Should be starter from Day 1 and for long time.

Eric Fisher, Central Michigan: Big performance at Senior Bowl and in workouts enhanced his status … Could play on left side or right … Excels as pass blocker, but is no slouch in run game, either … Has strong leadership skills.

Lane Johnson, Oklahoma: Also can play left or right tackle … Tall (6-6) for this position, but has flexibility and nice surge off ball … A former tight end who went from junior college to backup with Sooners to standout.

D.J. Fluker, Alabama: No fluke that he’s played on last two national champions … One of best run blockers in America … Needs to upgrade his pass blocking … Probably projects as right tackle in NFL.

Menelik Watson, junior, Florida State: Football was fourth sport … Native of England who played soccer, boxed and planned college basketball career … Learned American football’s intricacies at junior college, then made big impact for FSU.

Guards

Chance Warmack, Alabama: Best blocker on college football’s best team … Played for three national champs … Surges off snap to establish his territory … Will handle big defenders inside, but could struggle with speed rushers.

Jonathan Cooper, North Carolina: Unlike Warmack, Cooper should do well as pulling guard … Good pass protector because of agility … Probably needs to get stronger for heavy work inside.

Larry Warford, Kentucky: Solid player on bad team … Huge man at 6-3, 333, uses his size well … Has nasty streak on field that serves him well.

Kyle Long, Oregon: Son of Hall of Famer Howie Long, brother of Rams DE Chris Long … A bit inexperienced – baseball was his No. 1 sport – but coachable … Could be long-range project, but has bloodlines to succeed.

Centers

Barrett Jones, Alabama: Among nation’s most versatile players – linemen or otherwise … Comes at defenders every play, even will bark at teammates in heat of game … Played all over O-line for Alabama, won Outland Trophy and Rimington Trophy.

Travis Frederick, junior, Wisconsin: Badgers do linemen well, and Frederick is versatile prospect … Can also play guard … Strong, but with enough mobility to make blocks toward outside … Has a lot to learn as pass protector.

Brian Schwenke, California: Improved throughout college career … Gets off ball well … Well-coached player who relies on strong technique as well as mobility … Not as powerful as he’ll need to become.

– Associated Press

Advertisement