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Letters

  • Numbers reflect success; thatís worth celebrating
    What if I told you there is a state with a list of criteria, or a rubric, that could be used to determine whether a teacher was effective and in that state, more than 90 percent of the teachers scored at least “effective” or better?
  • Letters
  • Letters
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Letters

Knee-jerk reactions on guns cut both ways

This letter is in response to Don DeKeyzer (“Arming teachers poses disturbing scenarios,” April 16). He bemoaned the fact that Indiana’s proposal to arm teachers was a knee-jerk reaction.

I suppose Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s proposal to ban military-style firearms would not be considered a knee jerk reaction? I suppose the background and gun-registration legislation would not be considered a knee-jerk reaction? I suppose the cries to further erode my Second Amendment rights (they have been continually eroded since the founding of this country; brevity prevents me from going into detail) would not be considered a knee-jerk reaction?

I love knee-jerk reactions. When I was in the Army, we called it the “do something disease.” The people of this nation constantly demand that something be done in response to any crisis, whether the solution is a good one or bad one, and there is usually a self-serving politician just waiting to exploit that crisis. Maybe instead of knee-jerk reactions that never really solve the problem, maybe we should stop, take a breath, perform a proper after action review and develop a proper course of action. Not touchy-feely feel-good plans.

We set the stage for Newtown with such feel-good plans. By declaring schools as “weapon-free zones,” we told evil men that if you want easy targets go there. By simply doing away with “weapon-free zones,” we may instill the doubt in evil men’s minds that there may be a sheepdog among the sheep.

DAVID L. McCRACKEN Fort Wayne

Corn producers the cause of many of nationís woes

Perhaps Rep. Marlin Stutzman can address the following agricultural issues on the House floor: policies of the Department of Agriculture that are so negative in nature that they need to be abandoned.

•The production and marketing of high fructose corn syrup, a product so sweet that it destroys the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar levels, and thus is the primary cause of obesity and diabetes in America. Or, we could have the corn producers pay the medical bills of those so afflicted.

•Since it was cheap taxpayer-subsidized corn products that drove the small Mexican peasant farmer off his land and caused the immigration problem in the first place, I suggest that the corn producers pay the tab for border-protection costs or be issued weapons and spend one month per year patrolling the border.

KEN KOENIG Angola

Call before you dig, no matter the project

Spring has finally sprung across many of the markets served by Frontier Communications, bringing with it construction projects large and small. Spring is the perfect time of year to remind homeowners and construction companies to call 811 at least two working days before projects start.

Calling 811 connects homeowners and contractors to their state’s one-call center, which in turn notifies the appropriate utility of a party’s intent to dig. Professional locators go to the prospective digging site to mark the approximate locations of underground lines with flags, spray paint or both. This service is at no cost to the homeowner or contractor.

Striking a single line can cause significant injury and damage and result in repair costs, fines and inconvenient outages. Every digging project, no matter how large or small, warrants a call to 811. Installing a mailbox, building a deck, moving a road, planting a tree and laying a patio are all examples of digging projects that require a call to 811 before beginning.

The depth of utility lines can vary due to erosion, previous digging projects and uneven surfaces. Utility lines must be properly marked because even digging only a few inches carries the risk of striking an underground utility line.

April is “National Safe Digging Month,” a time when many stakeholders communicate the importance of professionals and homeowners calling 811 and following a safe digging process. Doing so is the best way to help prevent injuries, property damage and cable and fiber cuts that lead to inconvenient and inexpensive outages.

DANIEL SULLIVAN Fort Wayne general manager Frontier Communications

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