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Displaced resident Jeanette Sulak and her daughter Jill Sulak-Vrla listen during a town hall meeting Saturday in West, Texas.

Some go home after Texas blast

Residents eager to see damage, salvage property

– After days of waiting, the first group of residents who fled their homes when a Texas fertilizer plant exploded in a blinding fireball were allowed to go home Saturday to find out what remained.

The news came after a nervous day in which West officials told residents packed in a hotel waiting for updates about their neighborhood that leaking gas tanks were causing small fires near the blast site, keeping authorities from lifting blockades. But officials emphasized that the fires were contained and the town was safe.

“It is safe, safe and safe,” City Council member Steve Vanek said emphatically at a news conference.

He said residents in a small area would be let back in Saturday afternoon but did not indicate when all residents could return.

Residents with homes inside the zone were told to assemble at a designated location and show identification. As the hour when the area was to be opened neared, residents and insurance agents formed a mile-long line of cars. Law enforcement checked the IDs of each person inside.

Some who do not live in the designated area were turned away. Police used soap to number the windshields of cars allowed into the area.

Evacuated residents had been anxiously waiting to return and assess what is left of roughly 80 damaged homes after the blast Wednesday night at West Fertilizer Co. that killed 14 and injured 200 more. The blast scarred a four-to-five block radius that included a nursing home, an apartment building and a school.

Many hope to find insurance papers and family records to help with recovery. Others simply wish to reclaim any belongings that might be buried under splintered homes.

Tom and Tiffanie Juntunen were in the car line waiting to enter. As first-responders, they had gotten a glimpse of their home and knew what to expect but wanted to grab a few essentials before spending the night with friends.

“There’s a boil order, utilities could be sketchy, better to hit the road,” said Tom Juntunen, a 33-year-old construction worker.

He said their home’s front and back doors had been blown in and the garage door looked as though it had been battered with a sledgehammer.

“I thought at first the SWAT team kicked the doors in,” he said, “but then we saw the blast left all the kitchen cabinets open and all the other damage, and we knew it was just from the force of the explosion.”

The Juntunens live in an area farthest away from the blast where homes were less damaged.

During a town hall meeting Saturday, Mayor Tommy Muska apologized for failing to communicate with residents, telling them he was focused on technical aspects of the situation.

He said the damage northwest of the site is the worst. “When you see this place you will know a miracle happened,” Muska told the town hall crowd.

Those being allowed in are only to collect a few belongings, he said, adding there’s no water or gas and just a little electricity.

The mayor said “it’s devastating” closer to the blast area, which is where his family lives.

“I’ve seen our neighborhood and it’s not really pretty,” Muska said. “This is going to be a marathon, not a sprint.”

He said the re-entry would be divided into three stages and hoped everyone would get in within a week.

Students from a school near the plant that was heavily damaged by the blast will finish their year in a nearby town at a facility repainted in their school colors, red and black.

Earlier Saturday at a hotel where evacuees huddled, paramedic and town spokesman Bryce Reed told residents that small tanks were leaking and had triggered fires in one part of town. He said they were small and were contained, and didn’t cause further injuries.

Dorothy Sulak, who lost her home and her job when the blast went off, was among those hoping she could get back in. Sulak, a secretary at the fertilizer plant, fled with only the clothes on her back.

There’s a hole in her roof now, and her medicine, cash, even her glasses, are somewhere in the rubble. She used reading glasses for three days, until she could get a ride to nearby Waco to be fitted for new prescription frames.

“Yes, it’s just stuff. But it’s my stuff,” said Sulak, 71.

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