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2 planets raise hope at NASA of new life

– NASA’s planet-hunting telescope has discovered two planets that seem like ideal places for some sort of life to flourish. They are just the right size and in just the right place near their star.

The distant duo are the best candidates for habitable planets that astronomers have found so far, said William Borucki, the chief scientist for NASA’s Kepler telescope.

The discoveries, published online Thursday in the journal Science, mark a milestone in the search for planets where life could exist.

In the past when astronomers found exoplanets – planets outside our solar system – they haven’t fit all the criteria that would make them right for life. Many planets aren’t in the habitable zone – where it’s not too hot and not too cold for liquid water. And until now, the handful of planets astronomers found in that ideal zone were just too big. Those are likely to be gas balls like Neptune and that’s not suitable for life.

In the Goldilocks game of looking for other planets like ours, the new discoveries, called Kepler-62-e and Kepler-62-f are just right. And they are fraternal twins.

They circle the same star, an orange dwarf, and are next to each other – closer together than Earth and its neighbor Mars.

The planets are slightly wider than Earth, but not too big. Kepler-62-e is a bit toasty, like a Hawaiian world and Kepler-62-f is a bit nippy, more Alaskan, Borucki said.

“This is the first one where I’m thinking ‘Huh, Kepler-62-f really might have life on it,’ ” said study co-author David Charbonneau of Harvard. “This is a very important barrier that’s been crossed. Why wouldn’t it have life?”

The planets are 1,200 light-years away. A light-year is almost 6 trillion miles.

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