You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Movies

  • Weaver lending voice to ‘Alien’ video game
    Sigourney Weaver and the cast of “Alien” are virtually returning to the starship Nostromo. The actress who portrayed unflappable officer Ellen Ripley in the “Alien” film franchise is reprising her role in “Alien:
  • Ford injury to halt ’Star Wars’ for 2 weeks
    Harrison Ford’s injury will cause production on “Star Wars: Episode VII” to be suspended for two weeks.
  • ‘Transformers’ could earn record China box office
    BEIJING – The latest “Transformers” movie, which features Chinese locations, actors and products, has so far earned almost as much in China as in the United States, driven by a record number of screenings for a foreign
Advertisement

MPAA expands film ratings

Dodd

– The Motion Picture Association of America announced changes Tuesday to its movie rating system, saying the group wants to better inform parents about violence in films.

The new system, called the “Check the Box” campaign, will include a more prominent and detailed description explaining why a movie received a particular rating. One example read, “An intense scene of war violence, some images of carnage, brief strong violence.”

The changes announced by MPAA CEO Christopher Dodd in Las Vegas on Tuesday come in the aftermath of explosions at the Boston Marathon and recent shooting rampages, though the former U.S. senator did not address such examples directly.

The White House has called on the movie industry to help parents monitor violence in media since the elementary school shootings in Newtown, Conn., the state Dodd represented for 30 years as a Democrat until 2011. And in a sweeping proposal this year, President Obama asked specifically for a stricter rating system.

Dodd announced the industry’s plan at the annual movie-theater convention, CinemaCon, and spoke generally about the need to help parents “so they can make the best choices about what movies are appropriate for their children to watch.”

“I am not moved,” said Tim Winter, the president of nonpartisan Parents Television Council. “I think this is a distinction without a difference. A cynical view of the announcement today is, ‘How can the MPAA protect themselves and continue a toxic level of violence, especially in PG-13 movies, while providing themselves cover from all the scrutiny?’ ”

Advertisement