You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

World

  • House approves arms, training for Syrian rebels
    WASHINGTON – The Republican-controlled House has voted to give President Barack Obama the authority for the U.S. military to train and arm moderate Syrian rebels.
  • Separatists in Quebec, Scotland share lessons
    Quebec’s separatists are watching closely this week to see if the Scottish independence movement has learned from their failed attempts to break away from Canada.
  • Wary lawmakers ready to OK arms for Syrian rebels
    Wary House lawmakers prepared to give President Barack Obama authority to arm and train Syrian rebels in the fight against Islamic State militants Wednesday as Iraq’s new prime minister dismissed the notion that the struggle could
Advertisement

No progress in 2 days of Iranian nuclear talks

– Iran and six world powers failed to reach agreement Saturday on how to reduce fears that Tehran might use its nuclear technology to make weapons, extending years of inconclusive talks and adding to concerns the window on reaching a deal with Tehran may soon close.

Expectations that the negotiations were making progress rose as an afternoon session continued into the evening. But comments by the two sides after they ended made clear that they fell far short of making enough headway to qualify the meeting as a success.

“What matters in the end is substance, and ... we are still a considerable distance apart,” Catherine Ashton, the European Union’s head of foreign policy, told reporters at the end of the two-day talks.

Ashton, the convener of the meeting, said negotiators would now consult with their capitals. She made no mention of plans for new talks – another sign that the gap dividing the two sides is substantial. She said she would talk with chief Iranian negotiator Saeed Jalili by telephone about further steps.

Jalili spoke of “some distance between the positions of the two sides.” He suggested Iran was ready to discuss meeting a key demand of the other side – cutting back its highest-grade uranium enrichment production and stockpile – but only if the six reciprocated with rewards far greater than they are now willing to give.

Israel says Iran is only a few months away from having material to turn into a bomb and has vowed to use all means to prevent it from reaching that point. The U.S. has not said what its “red line” is, but has said it will not tolerate an Iran armed with nuclear weapons.

“The Iranians are using the round of talks to pave the way toward a nuclear bomb,” said Yuval Steinitz, Israel’s minister for intelligence and strategic affairs, in a message to reporters.

“Israel has already warned that the Iranians are taking advantage of the rounds of talks in order to buy time to advance in uranium enrichment, step by step, toward a nuclear weapon.”

Urging the international community to set a “short, clear and final timetable” for further talks, he said “the time has come for the world to show a more aggressive position and make it abundantly clear to the Iranians that their game of negotiations is coming to an end.”

Any strike on Iran could provoke fierce retaliation directly from Iran and through its Middle East proxies in Syria, Lebanon and Palestine, raising the specter of a larger Middle East conflict and adding to the urgency of keeping both sides at the negotiating table.

At the talks in the Kazakh city of Almaty, the U.S., Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany asked Tehran to greatly limit its production and stockpiling of uranium enriched to 20 percent, which is just a technical step away from weapons-grade uranium. That would keep Iran’s supply below the amount needed for further processing into a weapon.

Tehran also is only a few years away from completing a reactor that will produce plutonium, another pathway to nuclear arms.

Advertisement