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Letters

  • Misleading numbers no basis for campaign
    Beverly Zuber, the Wayne Township assessor, has always encouraged her staff to take an active role in educating the public by thoroughly explaining the process to taxpayers who visit our office, speaking at neighborhood association
  • St. John’s committee tackles Ebola relief effort
    The Oct. 12 Journal Gazette article regarding our efforts to evoke a response from Fort Wayne to the Ebola crisis in Western Africa is most appreciated. However, the article read like the fundraiser was a personal activity.
  • Goliath can be laid low in 3rd District race
    Goliath was a giant with heavy armor. David was young with five stones. Most believed Goliath would win the fight, but David did.
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Letters to the editor

IPFW community united in vision

As members of IPFW’s executive leadership team, we have remained largely silent with regard to the chancellor transition at IPFW. Any comments we have had to share regarding the change have been shared privately both out of respect for the process and so as not to appear to be siding with one perspective or another. Simply put, our loyalties are to IPFW rather than with any individual or group of individuals. It is out of that loyalty we are speaking publicly now.

Vicky Carwein’s education and experience made her a qualified candidate for the IPFW chancellor position, and she was selected by Purdue University’s Board of Trustees in consultation with members of a search committee and an advisory committee. The circumstances of her transition were not easy, and the budgetary pressures with which she has been presented are challenging. As people who work with her every day, she has handled both the transition and the budget challenges ethically and professionally. We also appreciate and respect the effort that she has made and continues to make to keep her focus on the present and the future as opposed to being drawn into past circumstances in which she had no say or control.

While there have been many helpful and important campus conversations regarding budget and strategic directions, we are concerned some recent public comments and discussions are harmful to an institution that is important to our students and to our region. IPFW will continue to be a strong campus community within a larger strong Fort Wayne community. It is important that all of us do what we can to help assure that future is realized, and we are committed to doing our part in that regard.

WALT BRANSON IPFW vice chancellor for financial affairs GEORGE MCCLELLAN IPFW vice chancellor for student affairs STEVE SARRATORE IPFW interim vice chancellor for academic affairs

Time to fight back on school ‘reform’

More and more of us are beginning to see the negative effects of the education reform bills. Whether it is from overtesting or whether it is from cuts in music, art and PE, don’t fool yourself. These budget and choice moves are having a negative effect on our children.

You need to make your voices heard. Be thoughtful and be reasonable, but let these people know that you are not going to let them ruin your children’s education. When teachers were the first ones to feel the deleterious effect on their classrooms, many people dismissed their warnings. Now the harmful effects are trickling down to your children. This is about saving public schools. This is about pushing back against the moronic reforms that are creating an economically re-segregated society. If you think it is only happening in other schools, take a good look around. Even the best schools are taking hits now.

PHYLLIS BUSH Fort Wayne

Look inward, NRA, regarding mental illness

Now that military-type assault weapons have been dropped from legislation on gun control now moving through Congress, I bet the National Rifle Association and the spineless politicians it controls are jumping with joy. They should be ashamed of themselves.

The NRA and the gun manufacturers are wringing the Second Amendment for all that it’s worth. They use fear and intimidation to sell as many guns as possible to as many individuals as possible, all the while making a killing. They could not care less of the consequences.

What weapons are next under the guise of “right to bear arms” – bazookas, hand grenades? Whatever it is, they will no doubt be supported by gutless politicians, mainly the GOP (Guns Over People). Never mind that the Second Amendment is a long way from its original intent of fighting the British during the revolution.

Australia banned assault weapons, and mass shootings have almost disappeared. The NRA and its minions would like for us to believe that mental illness is the primary cause for gun violence. That may well be true – and the mental illness is at the NRA itself.

JOHN CUELLAR New Haven

House hearing exposed anti-midwife arguments

I thank The Journal Gazette for its coverage of the Senate discussion regarding House Bill 1135 (“Midwifery legalization bill prompts Senate feud,” March 28). I would like to address several points.

The statistic of a two- to threefold increase in infant mortality is based on a flawed meta analysis heavily critiqued by many scholars, including myself, during the hearing.

Furthermore, there is a great deal of data outlining the safety of low-risk home births, although this was not mentioned in the article despite my testimony about these data.

Indiana’s dismal mortality rate is more indicative of the care 98 percent to 99 percent of women receive in hospitals (among other things) and can hardly be attributed to the 1 percent to 1.5 percent of home births.

The North American Registry of Midwives oversees the certification process for earning the Certified Professional Midwife credential. The CPM is recognized as a legal, competent midwife in 27 states (the article erroneously reported that 27 states were considering similar legislation).

I hope that The Journal Gazette and Hoosiers recognize that this is largely a professional turf war started in the 19th century by the American Medical Association and is based on ideology, not evidence-based research. Indiana women deserve to have competent, legal midwives attend them if they choose to give birth at home.

ALICIA SUAREZ Assistant professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology DePauw University

Wells County wind farm will boost area economy

I support the Wells County wind farm proposal for these reasons:

A wind farm will be a property tax benefit.

A wind farm will be an income source for farms and is not dependent upon economic issues. It would be very important income diversification.

A small vocal minority is making many unfounded complaints.

Landowners have the right to use their property in responsible ways.

Wind energy has had years of success with minimal negative issues.

Sound and shadow flickers have been extensively researched and are rigidly controlled in this development.

I suggest you spend some time 1,200 feet from an operating turbine to see what it is really like.

The local economy is in great need of the immediate boost that would be provided by construction.

This is a limited economic development that must not be missed.

DAVID A. PENCE Bluffton

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