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AP
FILE- Spain's Princess Cristina, right, and her husband Inaki Urdangarin, left, are seen during the Barcelona Open Tennis Tournament final match in Barcelona, Spain, in this file photo dated Sunday, April 26, 2009. A Spanish court has named the king's daughter Princess Cristina Wednesday April 3, 2013, as a suspect in an alleged corruption case involving her husband, and the court has announced that it will call her for questioning. The Spanish royal palace refused to comment Wednesday. (AP Photo/ David Ramos, File)

Spanish court names king's daughter as suspect

MADRID (AP) — A Spanish court has named the king's daughter Princess Cristina as a suspect in a corruption case involving her husband.

The Palma de Mallorca court said Wednesday that the princess is to be called in for questioning on April 27.

The case involves allegations that her husband, Inaki Urdangarin, and his former business partner funneled about €5 million ($6.4 million) in public funds to companies they controlled.

The royal palace refused to comment.

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