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The Dish

  • Deer Park boss visits beer camp
    Forget about boot camp. Tony Henry went to beer camp.The owner of Deer Park Irish Pub, 1530 Leesburg Road, recently found himself in Chico, California, at the Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.
  • Cindy’s is ready to shine
    Regulars at Cindy’s Diner aren’t likely to notice much of a change when the restaurant reopens at 6 a.m. Saturday.Well, except for the location.
  • FWCS retiree opens E. State coffee shop
    there's a new coffee shop in town. Biggby Coffee opened its doors Tuesday at 6568 E. State Blvd. The location is owned by a husband-wife team, Yul Craig and Deborah Ann Martin.
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Barbecue spot offers carryout

Andy's Knockout Barbecue, a company which had specialized in catering for corporate events and fundraisers, opened its first location last week, at 404 Broadway St., New Haven. Andy's is a carryout-only spot with a variety of barbecue favorites – St. Louis-style ribs, legs, wings, potatoes and the like.

But the favorite menu item has proven to be the half chicken, owner Mark Anderson says.

"It's just been a passion," he says. "Barbecuing is something my family has done forever."

The cooking is done on a 22-foot stainless-steel grill, which travels with Anderson for catering and fundraising events.

Part of the reason Anderson decided to open the carryout business was his success at Taste of New Haven last year. The event gave out an award to the customers' favorite, and Andy's won. Of the 18 businesses in the competition, Anderson says, Andy's received 72 percent of the vote.

To order, call 348-5664, and find the menu at AndysKOChicken.com.

Vegetarian Dishcrawl

After the success of the first Dishcrawl in Fort Wayne, another has been scheduled for 7 p.m. April 9.

The crawl will be a vegetarian one, featuring local restaurants on a bar crawl-like walking tour.

Reservations are $45 a person and can be made at dishcrawl.com/fortwayne.

Club Soda news

Club Soda, 235 E. Superior St., is holding what it calls one of its most popular annual fundraisers at 4 p.m. April 21 to benefit Mustard Seed. Mustard Seed provides furniture and household items to people in need. Tickets are $100 a person. To make a reservation, call 426-3442.

The restaurant has also announced that a new menu is scheduled to debut Monday, going back to the basics. According to its newsletter, the new menu will look a lot like it did when Club Soda opened in 1999, with a focus on meat – steaks, lamb, veal, pork chops.

"In other words, we will be doing most what we do best – grilling meat," according to the newsletter.

DeBrand tours

DeBrand Fine Chocolates will be holding extended tours in conjunction with the Vera Bradley Outlet Sale. The tours will be available from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through April 13 and noon to 5 p.m. April 14.

Cost is $5 and comes with a $5 coupon for a purchase of $10 or more.

Awards

Tanglewood Berry Farm, which opened to the public three years ago, has recently won a national award for research and development for an innovation that brings a crop to Fort Wayne that is difficult to grow in this climate: blackberries.

Richard Barnes won an award for Excellence in Technology Transfer as part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture ARS (Agriculture Research Service) Appalachian Fruit Research Station from The Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer.

The award – which is currently being renamed – recognizes Barnes for a trellis he created that allows blackberries to be grown in the cold-weather season. The berry doesn't thrive in cold weather, says Margy Hooker-Barnes, Barnes' wife and co-owner of the family farm, and the Midwest has virtually no commercial blackberry production. Barnes worked with the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the development, which also protects berries from being burnt by the sun, making it useful for California crops, too.

Tanglewood, 2427 S. Hadley Road, is one of a few USDA certified organic farms in the area, Hooker-Barnes says.

"What's happening is the last couple years, (certified organic farming has) been really huge," she says. "We find a lot of people come to our farm (who have) cancer. Being certified organic, there are no chemicals. The food is as pure and clean as it can possibly be. You can grow food on a farm that doesn't use chemicals, which is better than conventional farming, but it's still not as good as organic."

The Dish features restaurant news and food events and appears Wednesdays. Fax news items to 461-8893, email jyouhana@jg.net or call 461-8462. For more restaurant news, go to The Dish blog at www.journalgazette.net/thedish.

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