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Associated Press
Visitors take to the boardwalk Saturday at Coney Island, which, despite making the traditional Palm Sunday opening, has seen many of its seasonal businesses struggling in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy.

Coney Island hopes for rebound

Storm-ravaged park open again, not yet 100% operational

– At the beginning of each tourist season, the entrepreneurs who pitch the thrill rides, hot dogs, sideshows and souvenirs at gritty Coney Island gather along its famous boardwalk to pray for two things: good weather and large crowds.

Never have they prayed harder than now.

Five months after Superstorm Sandy’s surge swamped New York City’s most storied beach destination, many businesses are pinning their hopes on a strong season to help them make up for the hundreds of thousands of dollars they have spent to get back up and running.

“We’re almost dead, but we’re open,” said D.J. Vourderis, whose family owns and operates Deno’s Famous Wonder Wheel Amusement Park. “We’ve built it; now we’re just waiting for them to come.”

Vourderis logged 92 hours the week leading up to Palm Sunday, when Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz smashed a bottle of egg cream on the famous Cyclone roller coaster to officially christen the new season at Coney Island – not really an island, but an American institution on a peninsula where, at the turn of the 20th century, it became one of the country’s largest and most popular amusement areas.

The late October storm ravaged Vourderis’ business, and he was forced to replace all the corroded relays, circuits, breakers and wiring on the Ferris wheel. The family has borrowed to stay afloat and is about $500,000 in the red after paying for the repairs to the iconic 1920 Wonder Wheel, replacing 24 new bumper cars and redesigning the entire inside of the Spook-A-Rama ride, which was waterlogged.

“It’s going to take years to get us back to where we were,” said Vourderis, standing over hundreds of mint-green quarters that were oxidized so severely that banks won’t accept them without first having them cleaned in bleach.

Nearly 11 million people flocked to Coney Island Beach last year between Memorial Day and Labor Day, according to city figures. Most of Coney Island’s boardwalk bars, shops and restaurants are now open to sell cold beers, tchotchkes and fried clams to tourists and New York’s most quirky characters alike.

But the strongmen and sword swallowers who perform at the Coney Island Circus Sideshow will be out of work until May 24, when owner Dick Zigun is able to open the first floor of the landmark building that houses it as well as a bar, gift shop and dressing room destroyed by Sandy.

After tallying $400,000 in damage from Sandy, Zigun’s nonprofit Coney Island USA is hard-pressed to pay for this summer’s Mermaid Parade, an annual gathering of more than 1,500 people marching in wacky – and often revealing – costumes to celebrate the kooky seaside culture of Coney Island.

“We’re moving forward, even though it’s questionable,” Zigun said, adding that weather will be the deciding factor. “We are savvy Coney Island carneys; once we reopen, we are damn good at making money.”

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